Compliance Is the Next Big Thing

Compliance training is one of the fastest-growing sectors of corporate e-learning, accounting for more than 15 percent, according to 2012 surveys. But most importantly, compliance is often seen as the gateway to more comprehensive online ventures as companies often test the e-learning waters with mandated training.

With the increasing focus on regulation, compliance will drive an even more important part of corporate e-learning as companies scramble to demonstrate compliance.

E-learning provides the perfect opportunity to create context-specific training, to deliver it cost-effectively and timely; and to track learner understanding — all critical for compliance.

According to Mark Stanley, a Senior Principal Business Consultant with Genesys:

“The top pain point is when employees become involved in a compliance process. This is when risk increases because procedures for compliance become manual. Compliance is not supported by end-to-end workflow systems at this point, and we rely on people remembering to do the correct thing at the right time. So today, attempting to stay compliant typically depends on strong processes and great training.”

Stanley and others have actually observed the following problems:

>> Prioritization of tasks, including compliance steps, being selected by employees. They decide what tasks are important, or what order tasks should be accomplished.

>> Employees may mark a compliance task as complete, but they actually don’t do the task.

>> They fail to update the system so the audit trail is lost.

>> While workflow systems are wonderful at how something should be done, they fail to identify who is the best skilled person to perform a task.

>> Managers have little insight to what tasks have been completed, or if they have been completed in the right order.

Certainly, the stakes are higher with compliance training, because failing to comply with state and federal mandates can result in serious consequences. Harassment, workplace violence and safety issues can involve expensive litigation.

An online format suits compliance, by providing consistent, cost-effective distribution and the ability to reach a large, geographically dispersed population in a short time. Learners can access training 24/7 at their own pace from any location with the Internet. And most importantly, automated tracking and reporting of completion helps companies easily prove compliance.

For industries that demand local, state or federal compliance — like health care, banking, finance, real estate, government — e-learning professionals can work hand-in-hand with corporate compliance officers to minimize legal entanglements. If you’re not, you should be.

Compliance training is one of the fastest-growing sectors of corporate e-learning, accounting for more than 15 percent, according to 2012 surveys. But most importantly, compliance is often seen as the gateway to more comprehensive online ventures as companies often test the e-learning waters with mandated training.

With the increasing focus on regulation, compliance will drive an even more important part of corporate e-learning as companies scramble to demonstrate compliance.

E-learning provides the perfect opportunity to create context-specific training, to deliver it cost-effectively and timely; and to track learner understanding — all critical for compliance.

According to Mark Stanley, a Senior Principal Business Consultant with Genesys:

“The top pain point is when employees become involved in a compliance process. This is when risk increases because procedures for compliance become manual. Compliance is not supported by end-to-end workflow systems at this point, and we rely on people remembering to do the correct thing at the right time. So today, attempting to stay compliant typically depends on strong processes and great training.”

Stanley and others have actually observed the following problems:

>> Prioritization of tasks, including compliance steps, being selected by employees. They decide what tasks are important, or what order tasks should be accomplished.

>> Employees may mark a compliance task as complete, but they actually don’t do the task.

>> They fail to update the system so the audit trail is lost.

>> While workflow systems are wonderful at how something should be done, they fail to identify who is the best skilled person to perform a task.

>> Managers have little insight to what tasks have been completed, or if they have been completed in the right order.

Certainly, the stakes are higher with compliance training, because failing to comply with state and federal mandates can result in serious consequences. Harassment, workplace violence and safety issues can involve expensive litigation.

An online format suits compliance, by providing consistent, cost-effective distribution and the ability to reach a large, geographically dispersed population in a short time. Learners can access training 24/7 at their own pace from any location with the Internet. And most importantly, automated tracking and reporting of completion helps companies easily prove compliance.

For industries that demand local, state or federal compliance — like health care, banking, finance, real estate, government — e-learning professionals can work hand-in-hand with corporate compliance officers to minimize legal entanglements. If you’re not, you should be.

Leave a reply