Controversial Cyber Security Bill Passes the House

The controversial Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) has been passed by the U.S. House of Representatives.

CISPA is a proposed amendment to the National Security Act of 1947 that defines cybercrime as a national security threat, and facilitates information sharing between private companies and the government in the event of an actual or potential cyber-attack.

CISPA originally applied to hacking, but the version passed by the House included amendments expanding its scope to include any computer-based crime, including crimes involving the exploitation of minors.

Next, the U.S. Senate will vote on CISPA. The Obama Administration has threatened to veto the bill.

Critics of the law say that it does not protect individuals whose information may be shared with military agencies without a warrant or appropriate oversight.

Most technology and telecommunications companies support the proposed law. Mozilla’s representatives recently stated that the company is opposed to CISPA, citing privacy concerns.  

The Information Daily

http://www.egovmonitor.com/node/49814

Forbes:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2012/05/01/mozilla-slams-cispa-breaking-silicon-valleys-silence-on-cybersecurity-bill/

The controversial Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) has been passed by the U.S. House of Representatives.

CISPA is a proposed amendment to the National Security Act of 1947 that defines cybercrime as a national security threat, and facilitates information sharing between private companies and the government in the event of an actual or potential cyber-attack.

CISPA originally applied to hacking, but the version passed by the House included amendments expanding its scope to include any computer-based crime, including crimes involving the exploitation of minors.

Next, the U.S. Senate will vote on CISPA. The Obama Administration has threatened to veto the bill.

Critics of the law say that it does not protect individuals whose information may be shared with military agencies without a warrant or appropriate oversight.

Most technology and telecommunications companies support the proposed law. Mozilla’s representatives recently stated that the company is opposed to CISPA, citing privacy concerns.  

The Information Daily

http://www.egovmonitor.com/node/49814

Forbes:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2012/05/01/mozilla-slams-cispa-breaking-silicon-valleys-silence-on-cybersecurity-bill/

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