Corporate Managers Seek Improvement

According to a 2009 McKinsey Survey, nearly 70 percent of senior executives are only “somewhat satisfied” or “not at all satisfied” with the performance of their companies’ frontline managers. “More worrisome still,” the report contends, “the vast majority of frontline managers (81 percent) say they are not satisfied with their own performance.”

One of the main reasons for the lack of satisfaction is that companies’ training programs are not designed to help frontline managers, despite the potential impact their jobs can have. Only 10 percent of respondents say their companies’ frontline manager training is effective in preparing managers to lead. At this minority of companies, training emphasizes leadership and interpersonal skills.

While frontline employees are provided with extensive training, managers are not — even though for many, their present jobs may represent their first experiences leading others.

The McKinsey survey offers the theory that “perhaps frontline managers receive less training because of the way their jobs are designed at most companies: managers are expected to ensure that their direct reports do the things that the managers themselves excelled at to begin with.”

According to a 2009 McKinsey Survey, nearly 70 percent of senior executives are only “somewhat satisfied” or “not at all satisfied” with the performance of their companies’ frontline managers. “More worrisome still,” the report contends, “the vast majority of frontline managers (81 percent) say they are not satisfied with their own performance.”

One of the main reasons for the lack of satisfaction is that companies’ training programs are not designed to help frontline managers, despite the potential impact their jobs can have. Only 10 percent of respondents say their companies’ frontline manager training is effective in preparing managers to lead. At this minority of companies, training emphasizes leadership and interpersonal skills.

While frontline employees are provided with extensive training, managers are not — even though for many, their present jobs may represent their first experiences leading others.

The McKinsey survey offers the theory that “perhaps frontline managers receive less training because of the way their jobs are designed at most companies: managers are expected to ensure that their direct reports do the things that the managers themselves excelled at to begin with.”

Leave a reply