Dedication to Learning Continues

Despite the uncertain economic conditions that plagued both the private and public sectors in 2009, the American Society for Training & Development’s “2010 State of the Industry Report” reveals a continued dedication to workplace learning and development in a variety of organizations worldwide.

A.S.T.D. estimates that U.S. organizations spent $125.88 billion on employee learning and development in 2009. Nearly two-thirds of the total ($78.61 billion) was spent on the internal learning function, and the remainder ($47.27 billion) was allocated to external services. Direct learning expenditures, such as the learning function’s staff salaries, administrative costs, and non-salary delivery costs are included in this figure. The drop of 6.1 percent in overall spending from 2008 to 2009 is due to cuts by some organizations in these expenditures.

In the consolidated sample of organizations, there was a slight increase in spending on workplace learning and development in 2009. The average annual learning expenditure per employee for all companies surveyed increased from $1,068 in 2008 to $1,081 in 2009 (1.2%). Although overall spending on employee learning and development decreased slightly in 2009, on average, learning functions were serving a smaller workforce; therefore the annual learning expenditure per employee increased slightly.

The amount of learning expenditure as a percentage of payroll decreased slightly from 2.24% in 2008 to 2.14% in 2009.

Although the percentage of learning expenditure relative to an organization’s revenue and profit has been relatively constant in recent years, it increased in 2009. On average, direct learning expenditures increased from 0.59% to 0.71% of revenue and from 8.75% to 10.88% of profit in 2009. These percentages increased in 2009 because organizations’ financial commitment to learning and development held steady even while their revenue and profit decreased because of the recession.

After increasing steadily for five years, the average percentage of learning hours available through technology decreased slightly in 2008, but rebounded in 2009, reaching 36.5%, its highest level since A.S.T.D. began collecting data on the use of technology for this report 14 years ago.

An increasingly large proportion of e-learning comprises online learning (self-paced and instructor-led online learning). In 2009, 27.7% of all formal learning hours made available were online, an increase from 23.1% in 2008. Other e-learning delivery methods did not display much variation from 2008.

More info: http://store.astd.org/Default.aspx?tabid=167&ProductId=21817

Despite the uncertain economic conditions that plagued both the private and public sectors in 2009, the American Society for Training & Development’s “2010 State of the Industry Report” reveals a continued dedication to workplace learning and development in a variety of organizations worldwide.

A.S.T.D. estimates that U.S. organizations spent $125.88 billion on employee learning and development in 2009. Nearly two-thirds of the total ($78.61 billion) was spent on the internal learning function, and the remainder ($47.27 billion) was allocated to external services. Direct learning expenditures, such as the learning function’s staff salaries, administrative costs, and non-salary delivery costs are included in this figure. The drop of 6.1 percent in overall spending from 2008 to 2009 is due to cuts by some organizations in these expenditures.

In the consolidated sample of organizations, there was a slight increase in spending on workplace learning and development in 2009. The average annual learning expenditure per employee for all companies surveyed increased from $1,068 in 2008 to $1,081 in 2009 (1.2%). Although overall spending on employee learning and development decreased slightly in 2009, on average, learning functions were serving a smaller workforce; therefore the annual learning expenditure per employee increased slightly.

The amount of learning expenditure as a percentage of payroll decreased slightly from 2.24% in 2008 to 2.14% in 2009.

Although the percentage of learning expenditure relative to an organization’s revenue and profit has been relatively constant in recent years, it increased in 2009. On average, direct learning expenditures increased from 0.59% to 0.71% of revenue and from 8.75% to 10.88% of profit in 2009. These percentages increased in 2009 because organizations’ financial commitment to learning and development held steady even while their revenue and profit decreased because of the recession.

After increasing steadily for five years, the average percentage of learning hours available through technology decreased slightly in 2008, but rebounded in 2009, reaching 36.5%, its highest level since A.S.T.D. began collecting data on the use of technology for this report 14 years ago.

An increasingly large proportion of e-learning comprises online learning (self-paced and instructor-led online learning). In 2009, 27.7% of all formal learning hours made available were online, an increase from 23.1% in 2008. Other e-learning delivery methods did not display much variation from 2008.

More info: http://store.astd.org/Default.aspx?tabid=167&ProductId=21817

Leave a reply