Disappearing Jobs Report

According to Oxford study projections, 47% of jobs will disappear due to automation. The Bureau of Labor revealed jobs at greatest risk. “Some of the top disappearing jobs over the next two years include: executive assistants, farmers and ranchers, mail carriers, machine and electrical equipment assemblers, and door-to-door sales workers,” cites Michelle Armer, the chief people officer at CareerBuilder.  “In the next five years, [it will be] respiratory therapy technicians, textile dyers and patternmakers, fishers, switchboard operators and data entry roles.” 

According to Oxford study projections, 47% of jobs will disappear due to automation. The Bureau of Labor revealed jobs at greatest risk. “Some of the top disappearing jobs over the next two years include: executive assistants, farmers and ranchers, mail carriers, machine and electrical equipment assemblers, and door-to-door sales workers,” cites Michelle Armer, the chief people officer at CareerBuilder.  “In the next five years, [it will be] respiratory therapy technicians, textile dyers and patternmakers, fishers, switchboard operators and data entry roles.” 

Others propose that as industries suppress, others expand. McKinsey projects other industries will absorb the lost roles (see chart). For example, Research conducted by Deloitte revealed that between 2001 and 2015, technology had displaced more than 800,000 jobs in the UK alone, but it had created approximately 3.5 million new ones.

Take a quick glance at the McKinsey chart and see that retail (which is going online), manufacturing (automating), healthcare and education (online), may not be able to absorb these losses as in 2015.

The good news, according to Amer: “With record-low unemployment and a jobs report that came in better than expected with 263,000 new jobs added to the U.S. economy last month.” She reassures us that “there is ample opportunity for job seekers across all skill levels. We also found that the United States is projected to add more than 8 million jobs from 2019-2023, spanning industries and wage brackets.”

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *