E-mail Discouraged By N.C. Attorney

E-mail communications are a horrible way to discuss policies and issues, according to a presentation given to Macon County (N.C.) Board of Education members and reported in the Franklin Press.  Attorney Chris Campbell said that e-mail “discussions” are many times not appropriate.

“That’s best done at a board meeting or a work session,” he said, adding, “Don’t mail or send anything if you would be embarrassed or ashamed to read it on the front page of your local paper.”

Campbell also advised that if a board member receives an inappropriate e-mail not to reply or forward it. “Once you hit the send button, you can’t take it back,” he said. “Everything we do is public, so let’s be thoughtful about it.”

According to Press reporter Melanie Lebert, Campbell recommended that members use their “mcsk-12.org” e-mails for school business and keeping e-mails that are related to school business in a separate folder.

“E-mails that deal with school business are still public records,” he said. “Those are public documents. What you create and receive will be public.” 

E-mail communications are a horrible way to discuss policies and issues, according to a presentation given to Macon County (N.C.) Board of Education members and reported in the Franklin Press.  Attorney Chris Campbell said that e-mail “discussions” are many times not appropriate.

“That’s best done at a board meeting or a work session,” he said, adding, “Don’t mail or send anything if you would be embarrassed or ashamed to read it on the front page of your local paper.”

Campbell also advised that if a board member receives an inappropriate e-mail not to reply or forward it. “Once you hit the send button, you can’t take it back,” he said. “Everything we do is public, so let’s be thoughtful about it.”

According to Press reporter Melanie Lebert, Campbell recommended that members use their “mcsk-12.org” e-mails for school business and keeping e-mails that are related to school business in a separate folder.

“E-mails that deal with school business are still public records,” he said. “Those are public documents. What you create and receive will be public.” 

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