Knowing Your CEO, Prez, GM or Owner

In many large companies, the chief learning officer must deal directly with the leader of the enterprise. Whether their title is CEO, president, general manager or owner, he or she can, immediately and unilaterally, “buy” what you are “selling.”

Corporate leaders are unique, distinguished by five traits and characteristics:

1. They are intelligent on several levels. In his ground-breaking book “Frames Of Mind” (1983), Howard Gardner claims that people have the capacity to have various forms of intelligence beyond what we have typically viewed as IQ. They may have all sorts of mental gifts such as linguistic, spatial or interpersonal intelligence. It’s a pretty safe bet to assume that the leader of the enterprise has a level of emotional intelligence that is significantly higher than average.

2. Enterprise leaders tend to be life-long learners and usually have the ability to assimilate large amounts of information and rapidly extract the most important ideas, themes and dilemmas. Conversely, they quickly tune out of any conversation that does not appear to hold some fresh knowledge or insights for them or their business.

3. They traffic in superlatives. Deep in their DNA is an uncontrollable fascination with the best, the fastest, the slowest, the biggest, the newest and the cheapest. They are looking for the “-est” in everything.

4. They do not buy to look good. Most have little regard for what others think about their decision. The best will seriously consider the advice of others but will still make a decision that they believe, in their heart of hearts, is best for the business.

—This article written by Gregg Thompson, president of BluePoint Leadership. More info: www.bluepointleadership.com

In many large companies, the chief learning officer must deal directly with the leader of the enterprise. Whether their title is CEO, president, general manager or owner, he or she can, immediately and unilaterally, “buy” what you are “selling.” Corporate leaders are unique, distinguished by five traits and characteristics: 1. They are intelligent on several levels. In his ground-breaking book “Frames Of Mind” (1983), Howard Gardner claims that people have the capacity to have various forms of intelligence beyond what we have typically viewed as IQ. They may have all sorts of mental gifts such as linguistic, spatial or interpersonal intelligence. It’s a pretty safe bet to assume that the leader of the enterprise has a level of emotional intelligence that is significantly higher than average. 2. Enterprise leaders tend to be life-long learners and usually have the ability to assimilate large amounts of information and rapidly extract the most important ideas, themes and dilemmas. Conversely, they quickly tune out of any conversation that does not appear to hold some fresh knowledge or insights for them or their business. 3. They traffic in superlatives. Deep in their DNA is an uncontrollable fascination with the best, the fastest, the slowest, the biggest, the newest and the cheapest. They are looking for the “-est” in everything. 4. They do not buy to look good. Most have little regard for what others think about their decision. The best will seriously consider the advice of others but will still make a decision that they believe, in their heart of hearts, is best for the business. —This article written by Gregg Thompson, president of BluePoint Leadership. More info: www.bluepointleadership.com

 

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