Kundra Promotes Cloud Storefront

According to Vivek Kundra, the U.S.’s chief information officer, federal agencies should begin shifting their information technology systems to the cloud next year.

Kundra says the White House will emphasize cloud computing as a cost-saving measure. He says the fiscal 2011 budget will contain guidance for agencies about incorporating cloud solutions.

The fed’s three-part strategy for deploying cloud computing includes using Apps.gov to simplify the acquisition process, providing budgetary incentives, and centralizing the security certification process.

“There are legitimate concerns around security that the government didn’t try to address historically; they accepted that security couldn’t be addressed” in the cloud, Kundra says. “We’re now addressing those issues, and we want industry to rise to the occasion.”

The General Services Administration (GSA) wants agencies to streamline the process for security certification by accepting certifications for low-risk systems from other agencies. That way, vendors should not have to re-certify the same system multiple times.

A proliferation of data centers is evidence of the need to move to an infrastructure as a service model, where agencies pay vendors to maintain, operate and update servers at a remote location. Under such an arrangement, agencies pay only for the server time they use, rather than allowing their systems to run constantly.

The proposed storefront will copy the buying experience of commercial Websites like Amazon.com, where users can purchase items or services with just a few clicks. The initial version of the site offers four types of applications: business, productivity, social media and cloud IT services. The cloud IT menu includes four categories: storage, software development, virtual machines and Web hosting. But none of the cloud services are available yet.

Kundra says more offerings would be unveiled in the future, and vendors will include Microsoft, Adobe, Amazon and Salesforce.com.

According to Vivek Kundra, the U.S.’s chief information officer, federal agencies should begin shifting their information technology systems to the cloud next year.

Kundra says the White House will emphasize cloud computing as a cost-saving measure. He says the fiscal 2011 budget will contain guidance for agencies about incorporating cloud solutions.

The fed’s three-part strategy for deploying cloud computing includes using Apps.gov to simplify the acquisition process, providing budgetary incentives, and centralizing the security certification process.

“There are legitimate concerns around security that the government didn’t try to address historically; they accepted that security couldn’t be addressed” in the cloud, Kundra says. “We’re now addressing those issues, and we want industry to rise to the occasion.”

The General Services Administration (GSA) wants agencies to streamline the process for security certification by accepting certifications for low-risk systems from other agencies. That way, vendors should not have to re-certify the same system multiple times.

A proliferation of data centers is evidence of the need to move to an infrastructure as a service model, where agencies pay vendors to maintain, operate and update servers at a remote location. Under such an arrangement, agencies pay only for the server time they use, rather than allowing their systems to run constantly.

The proposed storefront will copy the buying experience of commercial Websites like Amazon.com, where users can purchase items or services with just a few clicks. The initial version of the site offers four types of applications: business, productivity, social media and cloud IT services. The cloud IT menu includes four categories: storage, software development, virtual machines and Web hosting. But none of the cloud services are available yet.

Kundra says more offerings would be unveiled in the future, and vendors will include Microsoft, Adobe, Amazon and Salesforce.com.

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