Leveraging Mobile Learning

Interest in delivering learning on mobile devices is high, but implementation is in the very early stages of development, according to a recent “pulse” survey by The Masie Center. Approximately 80% of organizations report at least a moderate interest in mobile learning. So far, that interest has primarily translated into projects to explore and test mobile learning and developing some content designed for mobile devices. At the same time, less than 30% of organizations have an enterprise strategy for mobile learning.

“The responding organizations collectively conveyed a wide range of learning elements they would like to deliver on mobile devices,” the survey noted. While there was no single stand out element, five had the highest percentage of “strong interest”: access to e-learning modules, access to corporate Internet content, access to video and audio content, and access to checklists. Second to those areas, organizational aspirations for mobile learning include making greater use of social media. Overall, these responses demonstrate the interest in many responding organizations to be more effective in providing on-the-job performance support and shorter, more focused learning activities.

Other survey notes:

>> Pressure to provide learning on mobile platforms is coming mostly from employees, including increasingly mobile workforces. Approximately 50% of survey responders reported that at least 50% of their employees already use their own smartphones/devices to access work-related sites or information — and this number is growing.

>> The notion of “bring your own device” is on the rise, and organizations may leverage it for their implementation strategies.

>> At the same time, nearly a quarter of responding organizations indicated that feel no pressure to deliver mobile learning. I.T. departments also show little interest in driving mobile learning. Factors that may be constraining the growth of mobile learning include a variety of technology and security concerns, the availability of organization-owned devices and issues related to the appropriateness of using personal devices.

>> Leveraging mobile devices for learning provides some important affordances, including the ability to provide learners with access to learning that is “anytime and anywhere”; reinforcement and updating of previous learning; maintaining proficiency; and using otherwise unproductive time for learning activities.

>> Chief among the concerns are the lack of sound designs for mobile learning (which can frustrate learners), technical issues that negatively impact the brand, the hype that leads learning organizations into adopting technologies that do not prove fruitful, and the potential that mobile learning will devalue in-depth knowledge and learning.

Masie’s survey received 823 responses from a range of organizations. These included small (less than 100 employees), mid-sized and large organizations (over 250,000 employees) that provide learning to their internal employees, external learning service providers and educational institutions. A variety of industries are represented with the largest response rates coming from the finance, banking, insurance, health-care and education sectors.

—More info: www.masie.com

Interest in delivering learning on mobile devices is high, but implementation is in the very early stages of development, according to a recent “pulse” survey by The Masie Center. Approximately 80% of organizations report at least a moderate interest in mobile learning. So far, that interest has primarily translated into projects to explore and test mobile learning and developing some content designed for mobile devices. At the same time, less than 30% of organizations have an enterprise strategy for mobile learning.

“The responding organizations collectively conveyed a wide range of learning elements they would like to deliver on mobile devices,” the survey noted. While there was no single stand out element, five had the highest percentage of “strong interest”: access to e-learning modules, access to corporate Internet content, access to video and audio content, and access to checklists. Second to those areas, organizational aspirations for mobile learning include making greater use of social media. Overall, these responses demonstrate the interest in many responding organizations to be more effective in providing on-the-job performance support and shorter, more focused learning activities.

Other survey notes:

>> Pressure to provide learning on mobile platforms is coming mostly from employees, including increasingly mobile workforces. Approximately 50% of survey responders reported that at least 50% of their employees already use their own smartphones/devices to access work-related sites or information — and this number is growing.

>> The notion of “bring your own device” is on the rise, and organizations may leverage it for their implementation strategies.

>> At the same time, nearly a quarter of responding organizations indicated that feel no pressure to deliver mobile learning. I.T. departments also show little interest in driving mobile learning. Factors that may be constraining the growth of mobile learning include a variety of technology and security concerns, the availability of organization-owned devices and issues related to the appropriateness of using personal devices.

>> Leveraging mobile devices for learning provides some important affordances, including the ability to provide learners with access to learning that is “anytime and anywhere”; reinforcement and updating of previous learning; maintaining proficiency; and using otherwise unproductive time for learning activities.

>> Chief among the concerns are the lack of sound designs for mobile learning (which can frustrate learners), technical issues that negatively impact the brand, the hype that leads learning organizations into adopting technologies that do not prove fruitful, and the potential that mobile learning will devalue in-depth knowledge and learning.

Masie’s survey received 823 responses from a range of organizations. These included small (less than 100 employees), mid-sized and large organizations (over 250,000 employees) that provide learning to their internal employees, external learning service providers and educational institutions. A variety of industries are represented with the largest response rates coming from the finance, banking, insurance, health-care and education sectors.

—More info: www.masie.com

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