Making Teamwork Work

Inside an organization, we’re always questioning what makes up a good and/or high performing team. We’re ranked, evaluated, prodded and quizzed on our level of team engagement, team satisfaction, and team morale not to mention all of those provided learning paths that help us become better team members, team leaders, and team contributors.

There are four key traits that seem to help a team prosper, ultimately giving it the opportunity to become high performing. These traits may not be exhaustive, but they can be demonstrable as it pertains to your level of success.

>> Thoughtful – We all have bad days. We all have families. We all have interests. To be thoughtful is to take interest in the other members of your team, whatever the team situation may be. To be thoughtless does nothing to help you achieve a high performing team status.

>> Educators – Don’t hoard, share. Don’t operate in a silo, collaborate. It’s incumbent upon every team member, regardless of title or rank, to share, give back and to educate others within the team. By doing so, you are not only connecting one another to each other’s knowledge, information and data, but you are also building relationships within the team that will help serve your overarching goals. Being an open educator loosely equates to being collaborative.

>> Aligned – No one likes rogue team members. Furthermore, nobody wants duplicate actions or objectives. If one is proactive, and the team is completely in the loop on all individual and team goals, the team is aligned and can more easily operate as a high performing group. Why are individual goals set without others aligned to them? Why are team goals set by a leader without input and alignment from the team itself? If one engages and explores with the team, as a whole, up front prior to action commencing, one is seeking proactive alignment and that’s music to any team member’s ears.

>> Measured – A team, to be high performing, should set its sights on a series of measurements that map back to the aligned goals and actions of the individual team members and the team itself. No one wants to be on a team that sits in limbo, who are unclear when objectives are due, to what level of quality or satisfaction, thus (as a team) establishing measured goals and actions will further enhance the chances of producing a high performing team.

–This article was written by Dan Pontefract, who hosts the Website www.danpontefract.com. He is head of Learning and Collaboration at Telus Communications, Inc., and an advocate of formal, informal, non-formal and social learning. E-mail him at dp@danpontefract.com.

Inside an organization, we’re always questioning what makes up a good and/or high performing team. We’re ranked, evaluated, prodded and quizzed on our level of team engagement, team satisfaction, and team morale not to mention all of those provided learning paths that help us become better team members, team leaders, and team contributors.

There are four key traits that seem to help a team prosper, ultimately giving it the opportunity to become high performing. These traits may not be exhaustive, but they can be demonstrable as it pertains to your level of success.

>> Thoughtful – We all have bad days. We all have families. We all have interests. To be thoughtful is to take interest in the other members of your team, whatever the team situation may be. To be thoughtless does nothing to help you achieve a high performing team status.

>> Educators – Don’t hoard, share. Don’t operate in a silo, collaborate. It’s incumbent upon every team member, regardless of title or rank, to share, give back and to educate others within the team. By doing so, you are not only connecting one another to each other’s knowledge, information and data, but you are also building relationships within the team that will help serve your overarching goals. Being an open educator loosely equates to being collaborative.

>> Aligned – No one likes rogue team members. Furthermore, nobody wants duplicate actions or objectives. If one is proactive, and the team is completely in the loop on all individual and team goals, the team is aligned and can more easily operate as a high performing group. Why are individual goals set without others aligned to them? Why are team goals set by a leader without input and alignment from the team itself? If one engages and explores with the team, as a whole, up front prior to action commencing, one is seeking proactive alignment and that’s music to any team member’s ears.

>> Measured – A team, to be high performing, should set its sights on a series of measurements that map back to the aligned goals and actions of the individual team members and the team itself. No one wants to be on a team that sits in limbo, who are unclear when objectives are due, to what level of quality or satisfaction, thus (as a team) establishing measured goals and actions will further enhance the chances of producing a high performing team.

–This article was written by Dan Pontefract, who hosts the Website www.danpontefract.com. He is head of Learning and Collaboration at Telus Communications, Inc., and an advocate of formal, informal, non-formal and social learning. E-mail him at dp@danpontefract.com.

Leave a reply