The 2017 release of Adobe Captivate - which went live in April - contains several enhancements and additions that make it easier and faster for e-learning authors to create high-quality, responsive content without programming.

 The new features are:

>> Fluid Boxes

>> Integration of Typekit fonts

>> Conversion from non-responsive to responsive

FLUID BOXES

The most significant change from Adobe Captivate 9 to Adobe Captivate (2017 release) is the addition of Fluid Boxes: intelligent containers that use white space optimally. Objects placed in Fluid Boxes get aligned automatically to the device or browser, without the e-learning author having to manually adjust the content, so learners get a fully responsive experience. Fluid Boxes can be laid out horizontally or vertically and have a host of properties that can be adjusted to give the desired outcome to the responsive project.

INTEGRATION OF TYPEKIT FONTS

With Adobe Typekit integration, e-learning authors can use high-quality fonts from the Typekit font library and ensure that a great viewing experience is delivered to learners across devices and browsers. Adobe Typekit is a Cloud-based repository of fonts that are Web safe - which means that the chosen font will look the same across devices and platforms, even if the font isn't installed. This is especially important with the prevalence of HTML5, where the content comes as text instead of a graphical element as in Flash.

CONVERSION FROM NON-RESPONSIVE TO RESPONSIVE 

Another major enhancement in the 2017 release of Adobe Captivate is the ability to convert a legacy desktop-only (non-responsive) project into a responsive course with just a few simple steps. This means that e-learning authors need not scrap or redo their old desktop courses. Instead, they can just launch an old Adobe Captivate (v8 and 9) project in the Adobe Captivate (2017 release) and save it as a responsive project before re-opening it and publishing to HTML 5 for a truly responsive e-learning experience.

Published in New Products

INTELLIBOARD announced its new Premium Integrator partnership with Moodle, the world’s largest, most-adopted, open-source learning platform. Corporate and educational users of Moodle worldwide can use the IntelliBoard plugin to significantly augment their reports and analytics – leveraging the rich data stores captured within their Moodle sites.

Published in Deals

FACEBOOK launches Oculus for Business product line; Partners with Cisco with Spark product line. VR version of Spark is a collaboration platform that supports messaging, voice calls and video conversations. Spark in VR allows remote workers to meet and communicate in virtual environments using avatars, allowing them to brainstorm on virtual whiteboards and interact with files. There are also integrations with Cisco’s digital whiteboard, Spark Board.

Published in Deals

Global corporate e-learning market is set to grow at a CAGR of close to 19% during the forecast period, 2017-2021 according to Technavio. The Americas currently account for $15.59 billion in revenues or 41% market share. EMEA represents 32.7% share and is expected to reach $30.82 billion by 2021. APAC regions is 26.3% share and will see 20% CAGR.

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“The market is expected to witness rapid growth during the forecast period owing to the increase in digitization and corporate realization of the importance of training in strengthening the workforce. In addition, e-learning helps companies overcome the obstacles that may arise from traditional learning formats,” says Jhansi Mary, research leader, Technavio.

Published in Trends

The 2017/2018 Learning & Talent Platforms Buyer Study conducted by Elearning! Media Group via an online survey of learning professionals reveals the current trends and purchase plans for 2018. These findings were tabulated from approximately 300 responses across corporate, government, education and non-profit organizations. The study was conducted industry wide and includes Elearning! subscribers and community members.

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Discover Must Have Features, Brand Ownership & Awareness, Buying Process and Roles in 2018 Learning & Talent Platforms Buyer Study Full Report Available February 2018 at 2elearning.com.

Published in Trends

According to an Informa study, 22 percent of channel professionals said their gross annual salaries increased due to new skills development or new certifications. This, in a time where most professionals are seeing stagnant or negative earnings growth.

“In this age of digital transformation and burgeoning new technology models like artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things and containers, it’s no wonder that training and career development also played a big role in salary increases in 2017,” Informa says.

Training in Cloud computing led the way, with 37 percent of channel professionals saying they had participated in training related to the Cloud in the past 12 months. Other hot skills include business intelligence, machine learning, artificial intelligence, data analytics, security, and automation.

Published in Latest News

The buzz was all about artificial intelligence (A.I.) at this year’s HR Technology Conference. No surprise, as the size of the global market for artificial intelligence for enterprise applications is worth around $360 million according to statistics.

A.I. HR implementations are seen in talent, recruitment and succession planning.  IBM Talent showcased some applications.  Several other companies displayed Alexa-customized solutions like Paradox, which is a branded A.I. coach. It claims to “build human-powered A.I. to engage, empower and understand large groups of people.” Oracle will be infusing its Cloud applications with artificial intelligence. “A.I. should be an enabler,” says Gretchen Alarcon of Oracle.

Published in Latest News

Learners in today’s workforce don’t want to be taught to, but expect to be able to learn. Millennials especially cite learning as the most desirable benefit a job can offer. They expect learning opportunities to be personal, accessible and flexible. That’s the heart of modern professional learning.

To be able compete in the war for workplace talent, organizations need to personalize the professional learning experience and empower employees to lead their own learning.

“It’s not just about the pay as it is about the whole experience of working for a business,” says Shane Sutherland, founder and chief designer at portfolio and personal learning platform company PebblePad, a D2L partner.

HOW TO PERSONALIZE LEARNING

There are four ways organizations can personalize professional learning.

1. CREATE PERSONALIZED LEARNING PATHWAYS

Enabling employees to create and keep online learning portfolios is a great way for organizations to pave personalized learning pathways. Online portfolios are a space where employees can build up evidence of their learning, reflect on their experiences, and share those reflections if they wish. In that way, they can make employees active actors in their own learning.

They can be transferable from job to job, so employees can tell the story of who they are, what they’ve learned, and the skills they’ve developed — a key consideration in the quickly growing gig economy.

Portfolios can be particularly effective when embedded into well-thought-out learning designs via an online learner engagement platform that presents learning to employees in specific contexts. Modern learning platforms can provide employees with easy access to their portfolios and other learning materials as needed — things like “just-in-time” social, mobile and video learning content, or content that they can access at their own pace after completing certain tasks or reaching different milestones.

2. PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR SOCIAL LEARNING

Conversation can be a crucial driver of personalized employee learning. Coaches, mentors and peers can all help employees to extract insights out of a learning experience, which can be something as simple as a discussion by the office coffee machine.

According to an October 2015 survey by the Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies, 88 percent of people believe knowledge sharing within a team is essential for workplace learning. Group research projects are a great tool in that regard— they empower people to seek out new knowledge, make sense of it, and share what they learn with their peers.

Manager-led learning, where managers act more like a coach or mentor and give people opportunities to learn through things like projects, can also drive social learning. Creating custom templates can give managers a framework for facilitating effective conversations around projects and performance: What 10 words would you use to describe your performance? What did you find most challenging? What do you feel you achieved?

3MAKE LEARNING MOBILE, AVAILABLE ANYTIME, ANYWHERE

Workplace learners expect to be able to access learning experiences anywhere, at any time, and on multiple devices.

According to Google, when it comes to search, 80 percent use a smartphone and 57 percent use more than one type of device. Gartner says that consumers will own and use three to four devices by 2018. And according to a study by Global Workplace Analytics, 80 percent to 90 percent of people in the U.S. workforce say they would like to telework at least part time, and Fortune 1000 companies around the globe are entirely revamping their space around the fact that employees are already mobile. That’s why it’s become increasingly incumbent on organizations to enable mobile learning.

4. ENCOURAGE EMPLOYEES TO TAKE OWNERSHIP OF THEIR OWN LEARNING

Empowering employees to learn outside the office is a great way to get them to take ownership of their own learning. They can learn a lot through online sharing with their own professional and social networks, and independently researching on the Internet — be it through Google, YouTube videos, or LinkedIn.

There are also many learning opportunities available out in the real world, too. Professional events, volunteering, hobbies and personal interests, and community engagement are also great opportunities for professional learning and development.

At the end of the day, personalizing employee learning is about more than simply modernizing learning and development. It’s also about providing learning that’s beyond the bounds of the work they must do.

—Jon Paul is Content Manager for D2L.

Published in Ideas

With so many things to incorporate into your training program, how do you know where to focus your efforts? A successful program requires many factors working together, but it all starts with a program manager dedicated to impacting business results and employees’ development. We work with those training champions every day, and through our partnerships with them, we’ve identified nine key areas to focus on for building highly successful employee training programs.

STRONG PROGRAM MANAGEMENT

Titles of training program managers may vary, but they all share a commitment to continually develop and improve their programs. Ideal program managers are curious, openminded, motivated, and interested in helping others develop their skills.

ASSESSING TRAINING NEEDS

Performing a needs assessment through internal surveys, interviews and research will help determine who needs to be trained and on what skills. Understanding these training needs forms the foundation of what makes your training program integral to the company’s successes.

ALIGNMENT WITH BUSINESS INITIATIVES

To see the strongest results from training, look at how training needs you’ve identified are tied into organizational initiatives. Help employees and leaders see how training and development contributes to the goals of the overall company goals.

4 CREATING GOALS  AND METRICS

When training and business needs are aligned, create goals that show the steps for how to achieve those results. Make sure these goals are achievable in a reasonable amount of time, and that they’re specific to the outcomes desired.

5 LEADERSHIP BUY-IN

Your leadership team’s support of the program is critical to seeing success. Once you’ve identified the needs, aligned them to organizational initiatives, and created strong goals, you can show senior leaders the impact of training on the bottom line. This opens all sorts of doors for a bigger budget, higher utilization and engagement, and the ability to build a learning culture in your company.

6 RELEVANCY OF CONTENT

The training content you provide to learners must be relevant for them to be engaged and really learn from it. Curating content for specific needs allows them to find information quicker and view your program as a valuable source for personal and professional development.

7  INFUSING CREATIVITY

Inviting creative ideas into your program helps grow engagement and a more positive attitude toward training. Collaborating and brainstorming fun ideas delights employees with training that is enjoyable and helps them get hooked on developing their skills.

8 ONGOING MARKETING

This is an area where many program managers struggle to maintain momentum. A successful marketing plan encapsulates initial launch activities, along with strong ongoing efforts throughout the program. Training communication sent to employees should always include the “why” and what’s in it for them. The goal of marketing is to increase utilization and engagement, so to do that, you’ll need to continually show employees how they’ll benefit from the available training.

9. POST-TRAINING REINFORCEMENT

Training is only effective if it’s remembered, so counteracting the brain’s natural forgetfulness is a critical part of seeing results from your training program, since 70 percent of training is forgotten within 24 hours. Providing opportunities for learners to recall what they were trained will help them commit it to long-term memory. Send follow-up questions and provide a space for discussions in order to see positive and impactful results from your training program.

—As a content marketing specialist with BizLibrary, the author researches and writes relevant and helpful content for the HR and L&D community. She manages blog posts, press releases, social media, and creates resources that educate and motivate the BizLibrary audience to take action and improve employee training in their organizations. Contact Brubaker at (636) 205-0354 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  .

Published in Ideas

Every business has its challenges when it comes to training employees, but there are three issues in particular that plague companies trying to improve their training programs. All three of those issues result in low ROI and negative views of training when they’re not addressed.

Effective training looks much different today than it did 30, 15, even 5 years ago. We have more access to data and scientific evidence that proves traditional approaches to training aren’t as effective as they could be if modern methods were incorporated.

Your employees have become accustomed to constant connection through various devices. They have access to media that’s relevant to whatever they’re looking for — whether it’s learning how to complete a task, being entertained, hearing about current events, etc. They expect their training experience to be up-to-date with the technology they’re using daily, and to deliver the information they need to be successful in their job.

In a 2017 report, Execu|Search found that 76 percent of Millennials rank professional development opportunities as one of the most important elements of a company’s culture. Considering that they are already making up about half of the American workforce, paying attention to the learning needs and preferences rising from Millennials’ development is crucial for a company to see any return on its training investment.

So, what are the needs and preferences of modern learners? Short content that delivers the message without overloading the brain’s natural capacity to take in information. Video based content with high production value. Reinforcement of training to move important information to long-term memory. If your training is too long, unengaging, and lacking reinforcement opportunities, it’s time to make some changes.

CREATE A MICROLEARNING HABIT

When you’re taking employees off the job for training or having them sit through hour-long courses, you’re missing the opportunity to help them become better at learning. With packed schedules and endless to-do lists, your employees need the ability to learn relevant information whenever and wherever they need it. This means they need short bursts of training (less than 10 minutes) that can be in-corporated into each day, a.k.a. microlearning.

Utilizing microlearning not only decreases cognitive load and allows for a higher percentage of the information to be absorbed, but it creates a habit of learning every day — which is a foundation of innovative and agile organizations.

QUALITY MATTERS: IS YOUR TRAINING A BLAST FROM THE PAST?

One of the biggest complaints from employees about their employer-provided training programs is that the content is out of date. Training videos from the 1980s are hard to take seriously when you’re distracted by the wardrobe choices and the inferiority of the technology. Video is the most popular and most effective format for a wide variety of training topics, but learners today will have a hard time engaging with anything that doesn’t have high production value or clearly demonstrate that it’s relevant to their job today.

HOW TO PREVENT TRAINING FROM BEING FORGOTTEN

The third and most critical issue has nothing to do with what happens during training. It’s all about what happens afterward. Our brains are wired to forget things that they deem unimportant, and they do so at a stunningly rapid rate. Within 24 hours of a training event, your employees will have forgotten 70 percent of what they learned — unless you counteract this natural forgetfulness with post-training reinforcement.

Making training memorable means using spaced repetition to help short-term memory transfer to long-term. Using quizzes right away promotes the first stage of recall, and then spacing out follow up questions (multiple choice, short answer, polls, etc.) signals to the brain that this information needs to be used, therefore it should be moved to long-term memory. Whether learners answer follow-up questions correctly isn’t important. Provide them with the correct answer, and the benefits of forced recall still stand.

To see greater engagement and ROI in your employee training program, try incorporating modern microlearning with post-training reinforcement.

Published in Insights
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