Mobile, Collab Rank High in H.R. Circles

The International Association for Human Resource Information Management (IHRIM) asked various luminaries to predict trends for 2013. Here are some of the most popular forecasts:

Social Networking: As businesses strive for greater employee engagement, they will continue to leverage social networks with their processes and systems — especially with performance management and learning management. Additionally, as there is a lot of content clutter in social, the use of platforms like Pinterest, YouTube and Slide Share will continue to grow as a way to help information stand out in infographics, videos and images. Collaboration will also play a large part in tying the organization’s workforce together, providing forums for new ideas and acceleration within the business.

Personal Devices: Since more employees are using mobile devices and bringing them to work (and expecting to use them), H.R. will be partnering more with I.T. in not only encouraging companies to allow the use of personal devices in the workplace but also helping create policies around their use. There will also be a drive to “appify” everything, as there will be a move from traditional PC/Mac programs and a push to making things user-friendly for an employee’s iPad/tablet. Compatibility and security will bring new challenges to I.T. in making these devices a part of the workplace.

Mobile vs. Desktop: The “desktop” workstation will start to be replaced by the mobile device — especially with the increasing use of tablets among consumers. And as more consumers use their mobile devices (both in and outside of the workplace), companies will spend time and resources on developing and/or improving processes designed for a smart device — particularly when it comes to recruiting, information access and learning.

SaaS: Organizations worldwide will continue to look to software as a service (SaaS) as a way to drive down costs — especially since it offers more configurable, always up-to-date and functionally rich applications. There will also be a growing breed of newer “as-a-service” products: integration (iPaaS), service (SaaS2), entire platforms (PaaS) accompanying the SaaS growth challenging the consumer with many varieties of configuration for technology and service.

Predictive Analytics: While workforce analytics will keep growing as a key H.R. and business management tool, there will be a huge push to integrate this H.R. data to help influence decisions in the boardroom. Predictive analysis will start to encroach on the metrics/analytics space.

Cloud Computing: More companies are moving their H.R. applications to the cloud. And more vendor companies are putting their software in the clouds. Because of this, there will be a big drive to meet the demands of complex and/or global organizations, as the H.R. tech vendors that get this right will have a remarkably competitive edge to their cloud HR systems.

Systems Integration: As companies continue to merge or be acquired, the need for developing a single, global system of record (SOR) grows.

Metrics: Metrics will no longer be considered optional, as vendors will be showing off user-friendly dashboards that can be configured used to provide the reports and information an H.R. manager needs.

Big Data: H.R. administrators still don’t know what use “big data” has, but it’s definitely invading the H.R. space.

Gamification: The use of “play” will be expanded to enhance employee engagement. As this grows, it will become a bigger part of all H.R. processes, rewards and recognitions and help to leverage the expectations of the newer workforce which already sees the value in “experiential learning.”

—More info: www.ihrim.org

The International Association for Human Resource Information Management (IHRIM) asked various luminaries to predict trends for 2013. Here are some of the most popular forecasts:

Social Networking: As businesses strive for greater employee engagement, they will continue to leverage social networks with their processes and systems — especially with performance management and learning management. Additionally, as there is a lot of content clutter in social, the use of platforms like Pinterest, YouTube and Slide Share will continue to grow as a way to help information stand out in infographics, videos and images. Collaboration will also play a large part in tying the organization’s workforce together, providing forums for new ideas and acceleration within the business.

Personal Devices: Since more employees are using mobile devices and bringing them to work (and expecting to use them), H.R. will be partnering more with I.T. in not only encouraging companies to allow the use of personal devices in the workplace but also helping create policies around their use. There will also be a drive to “appify” everything, as there will be a move from traditional PC/Mac programs and a push to making things user-friendly for an employee’s iPad/tablet. Compatibility and security will bring new challenges to I.T. in making these devices a part of the workplace.

Mobile vs. Desktop: The “desktop” workstation will start to be replaced by the mobile device — especially with the increasing use of tablets among consumers. And as more consumers use their mobile devices (both in and outside of the workplace), companies will spend time and resources on developing and/or improving processes designed for a smart device — particularly when it comes to recruiting, information access and learning.

SaaS: Organizations worldwide will continue to look to software as a service (SaaS) as a way to drive down costs — especially since it offers more configurable, always up-to-date and functionally rich applications. There will also be a growing breed of newer “as-a-service” products: integration (iPaaS), service (SaaS2), entire platforms (PaaS) accompanying the SaaS growth challenging the consumer with many varieties of configuration for technology and service.

Predictive Analytics: While workforce analytics will keep growing as a key H.R. and business management tool, there will be a huge push to integrate this H.R. data to help influence decisions in the boardroom. Predictive analysis will start to encroach on the metrics/analytics space.

Cloud Computing: More companies are moving their H.R. applications to the cloud. And more vendor companies are putting their software in the clouds. Because of this, there will be a big drive to meet the demands of complex and/or global organizations, as the H.R. tech vendors that get this right will have a remarkably competitive edge to their cloud HR systems.

Systems Integration: As companies continue to merge or be acquired, the need for developing a single, global system of record (SOR) grows.

Metrics: Metrics will no longer be considered optional, as vendors will be showing off user-friendly dashboards that can be configured used to provide the reports and information an H.R. manager needs.

Big Data: H.R. administrators still don’t know what use “big data” has, but it’s definitely invading the H.R. space.

Gamification: The use of “play” will be expanded to enhance employee engagement. As this grows, it will become a bigger part of all H.R. processes, rewards and recognitions and help to leverage the expectations of the newer workforce which already sees the value in “experiential learning.”

—More info: www.ihrim.org

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