MOOC Popularity Is on the Upswing

Twelve more universities have joined the growing roster of those using massively open online courses (MOOCs), including Duke, Johns Hopkins and Rice.

MOOCs, which have been offered online to anyone at no charge, have become increasingly popular since their introduction in 2008.

Although they share the common characteristics of being large courses open to anyone, there are two main types of MOOCs:

1) Connectivist MOOCs are more social and focused on deriving meaning of the learning experience with others. They allow students to participate through blogs, RSS feeds and other decentralized methods.

2) x MOOCs, which emphasize content mastery, centralize courses on one Website and use automated grading tools to support hundreds of thousands of students. x MOOCs include Coursera, an MIT and Harvard partnership called EdX, and a new venture founded by three roboticists called Udacity.

“This is a strong showing that the MOOC movement is not a passing fad; it’s not a passing fancy, but it’s something that’s here to stay,” said Andrew Ng, one of the Coursera co-founders.

—More info: http://www.convergemag.com/policy/MOOCs-Here-to-Stay.html

Twelve more universities have joined the growing roster of those using massively open online courses (MOOCs), including Duke, Johns Hopkins and Rice.

MOOCs, which have been offered online to anyone at no charge, have become increasingly popular since their introduction in 2008.

Although they share the common characteristics of being large courses open to anyone, there are two main types of MOOCs:

1) Connectivist MOOCs are more social and focused on deriving meaning of the learning experience with others. They allow students to participate through blogs, RSS feeds and other decentralized methods.

2) x MOOCs, which emphasize content mastery, centralize courses on one Website and use automated grading tools to support hundreds of thousands of students. x MOOCs include Coursera, an MIT and Harvard partnership called EdX, and a new venture founded by three roboticists called Udacity.

“This is a strong showing that the MOOC movement is not a passing fad; it’s not a passing fancy, but it’s something that’s here to stay,” said Andrew Ng, one of the Coursera co-founders.

—More info: http://www.convergemag.com/policy/MOOCs-Here-to-Stay.html

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