OPM a Leader in Open Government Plans

The Office of Personnel Management had the fifth-strongest Open Government Plans of all federal agencies with a basic score of 57, according to information released by its Website. Highest agency rating went to NASA (59 plus 18 bonus points), while the lowest agency rating went to the Department of Justice (29).

The Open Government Directive required agencies to develop and publish Open Government Plans by April 7th.

An audit earlier this year revealed a wide variation in the quality of the plans. Primary differences between strong and weak agency plans included: level of specificity; easy availability of information; thoughtful identification of key audiences and needs; and quality and sustainability of flagship initiatives.

According to the Website, many of the deficiencies in the plans are easily remedied, and some agencies already offered version 1.1 of their plans.

In the audit, the maximum basic score was 60, except for agencies without original classification authority, where the maximum was 58 points. Evaluators could also give an agency a bonus point for exceeding the requirement on each item. The highest number of bonus points received by any agency was 18. Bonus points were added on to the basic score, as a sort of extra credit. On several occasions the evaluators discussed how the scoring would be done for each item to be evaluated, particularly for the bonus point.

The Office of Personnel Management had the fifth-strongest Open Government Plans of all federal agencies with a basic score of 57, according to information released by its Website. Highest agency rating went to NASA (59 plus 18 bonus points), while the lowest agency rating went to the Department of Justice (29).

The Open Government Directive required agencies to develop and publish Open Government Plans by April 7th.

An audit earlier this year revealed a wide variation in the quality of the plans. Primary differences between strong and weak agency plans included: level of specificity; easy availability of information; thoughtful identification of key audiences and needs; and quality and sustainability of flagship initiatives.

According to the Website, many of the deficiencies in the plans are easily remedied, and some agencies already offered version 1.1 of their plans.

In the audit, the maximum basic score was 60, except for agencies without original classification authority, where the maximum was 58 points. Evaluators could also give an agency a bonus point for exceeding the requirement on each item. The highest number of bonus points received by any agency was 18. Bonus points were added on to the basic score, as a sort of extra credit. On several occasions the evaluators discussed how the scoring would be done for each item to be evaluated, particularly for the bonus point.

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