Reinventing Public-Sector KM

“Some people believe that it will take a new generation to reinvent how agencies leverage and share data,” observes Peter Goodstein of Mitre Corp., which provides engineering capabilities to civil and military agencies. “With a significant percent of the federal labor force approaching retirement, the new generation may implement the organizational changes, technology, processes and services that will enable optimal information sharing and knowledge management.”

Speaking at a SALT meeting late last year, Goodstein said that responsibility for implementing forward-looking changes does not rest entirely with the new generation of workers.

“[They] may prove helpful, but it is incumbent on the individuals providing governance and funding, architecture and technology to identify the myriad actions necessary to get the right information to the right person at the right time.”

He said that the terror attack of Sept. 11, 2001 might have been avoided had current technology been employed back then:

“The government had all the information it needed to know something was going to happen. If there was the right collaborative information-sharing mechanism, some kind of preventive activity may have taken place.”

In these days of instantaneous knowledge transfer, cooperation and collaboration is a necessity but it’s lacking in many governmental agencies.

“Each organization establishes its own classification rules and release procedures,” Goodstein said. “This results in:

>> “inconsistent application and understanding of security classifications;

>> “inconsistent certification and accreditation practices;

>> “conflicting information security standards; and

>> “lack of an incentive to integrate networks for seamless and transparent access.”

“Some people believe that it will take a new generation to reinvent how agencies leverage and share data,” observes Peter Goodstein of Mitre Corp., which provides engineering capabilities to civil and military agencies. “With a significant percent of the federal labor force approaching retirement, the new generation may implement the organizational changes, technology, processes and services that will enable optimal information sharing and knowledge management.”

Speaking at a SALT meeting late last year, Goodstein said that responsibility for implementing forward-looking changes does not rest entirely with the new generation of workers.

“[They] may prove helpful, but it is incumbent on the individuals providing governance and funding, architecture and technology to identify the myriad actions necessary to get the right information to the right person at the right time.”

He said that the terror attack of Sept. 11, 2001 might have been avoided had current technology been employed back then:

“The government had all the information it needed to know something was going to happen. If there was the right collaborative information-sharing mechanism, some kind of preventive activity may have taken place.”

In these days of instantaneous knowledge transfer, cooperation and collaboration is a necessity but it’s lacking in many governmental agencies.

“Each organization establishes its own classification rules and release procedures,” Goodstein said. “This results in:

>> “inconsistent application and understanding of security classifications;

>> “inconsistent certification and accreditation practices;

>> “conflicting information security standards; and

>> “lack of an incentive to integrate networks for seamless and transparent access.”

Leave a reply