The Future of Cloud Computing

You think Cloud computing has a future? Microsoft does. Ninety percent of the company’s R&D budget ($8.6 billion) is being used to improve Cloud computing technology, including security measures and hosting services. Anywhere between 7 million (SOA World magazine) and 14 million (www.siliconrepublic.com) jobs will be created by the Cloud computing market in the next three years. So demand for Cloud-ready I.T. workers will grow by 26 percent each year through 2015, according to a new Microsoft-sponsored IDC whitepaper.

“The Cloud brings a new set of skills that haven’t been needed in the past,” says Cushing Anderson, program vice-president at IDC. “There is no one-size-fits-all set of criteria for jobs in Cloud computing. Therefore, training and certification is essential for preparing prospective job candidates to work in cloud-related jobs.”

Yet a new survey of 327 CIOs, business executives and other stakeholders conducted by Dimensional Research and sponsored by Host Analytics reveals that 81% of respondents say they are “easily able to find employees or contractors” who can help customize software-as-a-service applications.

Some current uses of the Cloud:

1) Gmail (425 million people worldwide)

2) Apple’s iCloud (150 million)

3) Dropbox (50 million)

By 2016, 340 million more people will have moved to the Cloud, including 58% who will use social networking sites and 19% who will use online file sharing.

Yet, most people aren’t quite sure what “the Cloud” is. According to a Silicon Republic survey of the general public,

>> 54% claim they’ve never used the Cloud;

>> 51% believe stormy weather has an effect on Cloud computing;

>> 29% think the Cloud has something to do with weather;

>> and only 16% correctly think the Cloud is a place to store, access and share data.

But enterprises should beware of “Cloud washers,” according to Charles Babcock of InformationWeek magazine: “There’s a lot of cloud washing—renaming existing products, after a few tweaks, with the word cloud inserted.”

Edwin Schouten of IBM, writing in Wired magazine, adds: “Thankfully there are more and more standards emerging for cloud computing, which most of the larger I.T. providers are adopting. So consumers, get educated! Not with I.T.-provided collateral, but by using knowledge of well-renowned standardization bodies. Good examples for this are NIST, The Open Group (TOG), Cloud Standards Customer Council (CSCC), The Cloud Computing Use Case Discussion Group, Open Stack and TOSCA.”

Cloud computing may introduce new challenges, but organizations appear to be ready to handle them, a new survey suggests. An overwhelming majority of IT executives say they’re having no problems finding the skills they need to move forward with cloud engagements, according to an article on Forbes.com.

—Sources: www.siliconrepublic.com, http://soa.sys-con.com, www.wired.com, www.informationweek.com, www.forbes.com

You think Cloud computing has a future? Microsoft does. Ninety percent of the company’s R&D budget ($8.6 billion) is being used to improve Cloud computing technology, including security measures and hosting services. Anywhere between 7 million (SOA World magazine) and 14 million (www.siliconrepublic.com) jobs will be created by the Cloud computing market in the next three years. So demand for Cloud-ready I.T. workers will grow by 26 percent each year through 2015, according to a new Microsoft-sponsored IDC whitepaper.

“The Cloud brings a new set of skills that haven’t been needed in the past,” says Cushing Anderson, program vice-president at IDC. “There is no one-size-fits-all set of criteria for jobs in Cloud computing. Therefore, training and certification is essential for preparing prospective job candidates to work in cloud-related jobs.”

Yet a new survey of 327 CIOs, business executives and other stakeholders conducted by Dimensional Research and sponsored by Host Analytics reveals that 81% of respondents say they are “easily able to find employees or contractors” who can help customize software-as-a-service applications.

Some current uses of the Cloud:

1) Gmail (425 million people worldwide)

2) Apple’s iCloud (150 million)

3) Dropbox (50 million)

By 2016, 340 million more people will have moved to the Cloud, including 58% who will use social networking sites and 19% who will use online file sharing.

Yet, most people aren’t quite sure what “the Cloud” is. According to a Silicon Republic survey of the general public,

>> 54% claim they’ve never used the Cloud;

>> 51% believe stormy weather has an effect on Cloud computing;

>> 29% think the Cloud has something to do with weather;

>> and only 16% correctly think the Cloud is a place to store, access and share data.

But enterprises should beware of “Cloud washers,” according to Charles Babcock of InformationWeek magazine: “There’s a lot of cloud washing—renaming existing products, after a few tweaks, with the word cloud inserted.”

Edwin Schouten of IBM, writing in Wired magazine, adds: “Thankfully there are more and more standards emerging for cloud computing, which most of the larger I.T. providers are adopting. So consumers, get educated! Not with I.T.-provided collateral, but by using knowledge of well-renowned standardization bodies. Good examples for this are NIST, The Open Group (TOG), Cloud Standards Customer Council (CSCC), The Cloud Computing Use Case Discussion Group, Open Stack and TOSCA.”

Cloud computing may introduce new challenges, but organizations appear to be ready to handle them, a new survey suggests. An overwhelming majority of IT executives say they’re having no problems finding the skills they need to move forward with cloud engagements, according to an article on Forbes.com.

—Sources: www.siliconrepublic.com, http://soa.sys-con.com, www.wired.com, www.informationweek.com, www.forbes.com

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