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Global Corporate E-learning Market Expanding 19%

Global corporate e-learning market is set to grow at a CAGR of close to 19% during the forecast…

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Learning! 100

The 2017 Learning! 100

If there is a lesson to be learned from this year’s Learning! 100 honorees, it is that there is… Read more...

The 2017 Learning! 100

If there is a lesson to be learned from this year’s Learning! 100 honorees, it is that there is… Read more...

Enterprise Learning! Conference 2017 Announces Six…

9th Annual Enterprise Learning! Conference Announces 6 Keynotes and 2 Awards Events at August… Read more...

Best of Elearning!

The 2017 Learning! 100

If there is a lesson to be learned from this year’s Learning! 100 honorees, it is that there is always room for improvement, that learning organizations cannot stand pat from year to year, no matter… Read more...

99 Solutions Named Best Of Elearning!…

The 2016 “Best of Elearning!” awards honor best-in-class solutions across the learning and technology marketplace. Celebrating their 12th year, these honors are bestowed across 27 different… Read more...

The 2017 Learning! 100

If there is a lesson to be learned from this year’s Learning! 100 honorees, it is that there is always room for improvement, that learning organizations cannot stand pat from year to year, no matter… Read more...
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Learners forget 70% of what they learn over a 24-hour period, so organizations need to find ways to reinforce their training in order to realize a positive return on investment.

After budget concerns, “reinforcing training so that it sticks” is the greatest challenge faced by training and learning departments today. Indeed, “Burst and Boost” have become buzzwords in the industry, referring to best practices surrounding short-form content with heavy follow-up. This is a recognition on the part of the industry that, for training to be effective, there have to be ways to make it stick—otherwise, companies will never see a positive return on their investment.

The problem is built right into our brains: Research from Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard University found that the learning curve for just about any kind of information drops off exponentially, meaning that people will forget a full 70 percent of what they learn after a mere 24 hours have elapsed. This means that training programs that do not address retention are, at best, only 30 percent effective at behavioral change.

So how can L&D departments do better? There are many good psychological theories about what is conducive to remembering. In a nutshell, these theories agree that information is not so much “stored” and “retrieved” in the brain as it is connected, rehearsed, and reconstructed. Remembering information, then, is more a matter of engaging in the right sorts of activities to recall, use, and re-engage with information.

On a practical level, there are many ways to do this:

FOLLOWING UP WITH THE RIGHT “BOOST” CONTENT.

Summaries or recaps of critical pieces of information can prompt memory, helping employees recall what they have learned. It also refocuses their attention on what is important and helps them decipher their notes. Receiving reviews on a weekly or monthly basis can thus solidify what was learned, and can easily be done with a short “CliffsNotes” version of the training in the form of a one-to-two-minute video highlighting the main ideas.

PERIODIC QUESTIONS AND QUIZZES.

People are more likely to remember information that they must use to answer a question or figure out a problem. That kind of re-engagement is a great way to boost recall, especially when the questions require applying the information to a scenario the learner will see on the job. For example, periodic quizzes can be scheduled for two days, two weeks, and two months afterward, allowing for spaced learning— proven to be the best method for retaining information.

MOTIVATION THROUGH COMPETITION.

You don’t need a huge budget and a team of programmers to “gamify” your training experience. You can enhance training reinforcement simply by adding some elements of competition to motivate your employees. For example, you can add badges and leaderboards to your training program so that employees can have a public display of what they have done, adding to their overall sense of accomplishment. Quiz contests can work well too: After sending out your post-training quizzes, gather the results and offer small incentives for those who complete them with a better-than-passing grade.

WHAT DO THESE ACTIVITIES ACCOMPLISH?

The main aim of these methods is to reinforce what has been learned. During the process of reinforcement, short-term memories of the actual training event are slowly turned into long-term memories that can truly change behavior. This halts the forgetting curve and makes the learned information more easily accessible from memory. As a side benefit, employees feel more confident, engaged, and knowledgeable.

What’s more, training programs that succeed in doing this provide a positive return on investment over the long term. Training programs that do not take reinforcement seriously often falter as the forgetting curve kicks in.

–Ryan Eudy is CEO of ej4. Ej4 is a 2016 Best of Elearning! winner. Learn more at: www.ej4.com

Published in Ideas

5 Tips for Maximizing Your Learning Content Investment

Stuck in inflexible pages, much of today’s learning material remains trapped in traditional formal vehicles like elearning courses or presentations. As a result, learning content – and the time and effort that goes into it – is often poorly leveraged. But it doesn’t have to be that way.

STRIVE FOR SINGLE SOURCE, MULTI-PURPOSE CONTENT

Organizations are awaking to the importance content plays as a competitive differentiator and are now demanding tools and processes that allow them to gather, create, organize, disperse, and re-use learning content in multiple ways, across multiple learning vehicles.

Today’s learning content development tools need to support the creation of single-source, multi-purpose content for both formal and informal learning experiences. As you build out your learning content strategy, look for tools and processes that allow your organization to collaboratively create content that can be used at multiple times of need — from formal learning through to application on the job — and let you to measure its effectiveness.

FIND THE RIGHT TOOLS

There’s been a rush for authoring tool vendors to get on the responsive band-wagon. That’s great news for those wanting to develop content that can be accessed on multiple devices and used in multiple ways, but beware, not all responsive tools are created equal. Truly responsive content means developers can build rich learning experiences without worrying about specific devices or multiple versions of the same content.

Stay away from vendors that enforce a dumbed-down approach to learning content development. Templated, fill-inthe-blank, or block-based tools help get stuff out the door and satisfy the responsive checkbox, but they often don’t satisfy the learning need.

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE POWER OF MANY

Today’s learning organizations must adjust to the rapidly changing content requirements of their audiences. Whether it’s evolving regulations, product updates, or changing business drivers, training departments must deliver content that is relevant and useful — with little or no delay. While there are still content developers that work alone, team-based development models have become the norm because they can leverage the collective skill and expertise of dispersed teams.

To make the most of the time and dollars spent on learning programs, all learning stakeholders (authors, subject matter experts, sponsors) need to easily engage in the development process. Explore integrated, collaborative development platforms that satisfy the needs of all your learning stakeholders.

LOOK TO THE FUTURE

Future organizational learning success means making the right tool and process decisions today. The history (and current state) of learning technologies is full of horror stories about costly investments in proprietary technologies that lock up content and make it unusable beyond its initial purpose. Eschew propriety technologies and focus on vendor neutral, standards-based platforms. You’ll own your own content and be able to re-use and repurpose it freely — both today and tomorrow.

DON’T SETTLE FOR LESS

Learning content developers need to make the best learning experiences possible — quickly and efficiently. Don’t settle for an uncompromised content development experience. Platforms and tools exist that offer both powerful features AND simpleto-use environments. Search out robust, scalable solutions that give you the power to create meaningful learning content, without the need for complicated interfaces or programing languages.

IT’S ALWAYS ABOUT CREATING GREAT LEARNING EXPERIENCES

How your organization gathers, creates, organizes and disperses content to support its business goals can mean the difference between market leadership and failure. Always keep in mind that it’s not about creating great eLearning, it’s about building and sharing great learning experiences — and then maximizing your content use and value.

-- Luke Hickey is CEO of dominKnow Learning Systems, a multiple winner of 2016 Best of Elearning! award. Learn more at: www.domiknow.com

Published in Ideas

What is 70:20:10? Most L&D professionals will describe this model or framework as:

>> 70% of learning is experiential learning: people learn and develop on the job through day to day tasks, challenges and practice

>> 20% of learning is social learning: people learn and develop through coaching, mentoring and interaction with peers

>> 10% of learning is formal learning: people learn and develop through structured events, which includes online courses and programs Simply put: this is a learning mix.

This is intuitive. “Practice makes perfect” is what we were told. It can be applied to anything … spelling words, riding a bike, learning to piano, you name it. If you don’t practice, you don’t make progress. You can’t learn to throw a curve ball by ONLY listening to a coach. You have to practice (this is the 70%), coaching on your form (the 20%), and a little bit of theory (10%).

The same applies to work. One cannot reach proficiency or even mastery without doing. Period. The more complex the skill, the more practice needed. For instance, you can’t become a really good negotiator by simply taking an e-learning course. The course can guide you. Only if you negotiate will you become an effective negotiator.

Bottom line? Formal training is important to lay some ground work and serve as a guide. Doing the job is where the development and progress happens.

“The 70:20:10 framework is fast becoming the preferred strategy to improve workplace performance. It is applicable across all sectors and organizations, regardless of size, because of its holistic and agile nature,” says Charles Jennings.

What are the benefits of doing this? “Organizations have reported up to a 75% reduction in training spend through introduction of the 70:20:10 framework,” according to the 70:20:10 Forum.

Significant results are being seen by organizations. Training and development budgets are getting a bigger return on their investment by the results of on the job development.

So how can an organization help their employees develop on the job? Here are two best practices to help learners make the transition from the formal e-learning space to on-the-job, moving you closer to achieving 70:20:10 in your learning mix.

1. Provide learners with an exercise to complete. Provide step-by-step instructions to guide the learner on a task or situation so nothing is left to chance. The 10%, although the smallest piece, is still critical for guidance and instruction.

2. Provide job aids to support the learner while completing the exercise on-the-job. The barriers come down and allow the learner to complete the exercise from start to finish. This builds confidence, and confidence leads to success.

To review all five best practices, download our 70:20:10 Guide – Structure the 70 from our website at: http://www.vadoinc.net/702010.

To see management development or employee business skill courses created to leverage the natural way a person develops, visit Vado’s website to request a demonstration: http://www.vadoinc.net/OurCoursesor telephone (952) 545-6698 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Published in Ideas

Considering replacing your LMS? You’re not alone! According to Brandon Hall, 66% of companies are currently looking for a new LMS. Their objectives? Better data and integrations, mobile capabilities, and enhanced reporting.

But what if you didn’t necessarily need to replace your LMS to achieve those goals? What if you could find a flexible technology solution that worked with and around your LMS? Welcome to the modern learning ecosystem.

STEP 1: IMPLEMENT A LEARNING RECORD STORE (LRS) AND EXPERIENCE API (XAPI)

What is a Learning Record Store? An LRS is a database that collects and stores millions of learning actions from your training. xAPI is a simple data format that technology applications can use to record experiences. It can produce an activity stream (I, did, this), with timestamps second by second, of what happens during learning events. By using an LRS alongside an existing LMS, companies are now able to get the training data they have been missing for years and more importantly, integrate that data throughout their enterprise ecosystem including their LMS, HRIS, TMS, and PMS. All of your current/legacy training can be xAPI enabled as well as new training.

STEP 2: USE A NEXT-GENERATION COURSEWARE THAT IS DEVICE AGNOSTIC, INTERACTIVE, AND XAPI ENABLED

Interactive Courseware - Most companies are well aware their training needs to be delivered via today’s most used technologies on the mobile smartphone, tablet, and PC. In fact 88% of companies are looking to improve their learner experience and to get better reporting from it. But unfortunately most LMSs are still adapting to the rapid advance of technology and still have not solved the problems around any device learning. The good news is there are now mobile and xAPI enabled courseware products like Riptide Elements that allows you to deliver your courses to any device and in any language while working with your LMS to be compatible to current processes.

In-line Training Courseware - As more and more companies have business critical software running their companies and being used by their customers, training new employees and users in how to use their software effectively and efficiently has become key to business performance. New tools like Riptide’s Waypoints in-line training with competency based assessments allows you to make onboarding and training a native experience within your own software to test and track exactly how well users learn how to use it.

STEP 3: LEVERAGE DATA VISUALIZATION AND PERFORMANCE ANALYTICS TO COMMUNICATE KPIS AND ROI T

apping into the full potential of a Learning Record Store, Riptide’s Performance Analytics software brings L&D leaders the actionable data to show clear and simple ROI to the C-Suite, to Performance Managers, and to their Instructional Designers.

HOW CAN YOU GET STARTED IN TAKING THESE 3 STEPS?

The best way to start is to prioritize what you want to do first, establish success criteria, and prove the principle with a pilot implementation. Ready to get started? Visit RiptideLearning.com to request a free learning technology consultation today.

-- Nick Washburn is Director of Learning at Riptide Software. Contact him at  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Published in Ideas

 

Trainers can incorporate marketing concepts in learning.

By Emma King, INXPO

Marketers have been leading the way for many years, delivering a simple yet attractive message in short snippets or segments, like TV advertising slots or social media. When training employees in a virtual learning environment, often the goals are very similar to that of a marketer’s, the strategy needs to grab the viewers’ attention and help them retain information. Luckily for trainers, marketers have already shown us many different tried and true best practices to apply to virtual learning.

Target your demographic. Marketers work to place their TV show on a channel that fits their ideal target audience. “Top Chef” wouldn’t air on MTV, and “The Deadliest Catch” would never air on E!. Applying this same concept, trainers should segment their content into different channels based on the learning profile, or demographic, of the specific user. Therefore, learning content that is relevant to the user is easily separated, ensuring that the learning topics are better focused to the user. Content should also be delivered wherever employees are with the option to choose to tune in from their phone, tablet or laptop.

Create an “Aha” moment in a short period of time. Successful marketing accommodates shorter attention spans and capitalizes on getting a message across in a short period of time while still making an impact. Successful learning must run off of the same concept. Effective trainers should be creating bite size chunks of content that are easier to absorb and retain within a minimum investment in time. 

Run a social media stream in parallel to content. Live tweeting during TV shows has become an increasingly popular way viewers engage with programming. Marketers know this helps drive activity with their audience. Having a strong presence on social media helps create a conversation around their messaging. When applicable to external audiences adding a social media stream can give learners a platform to share what they have learned and help people to stay engaged. Social streams continue the conversation and bring empowerment to the learners though interacting with thought leaders on the subject.

Give an easy reference. QR Codes, such as the one on the left, can often be found on the packaging of products that consumers purchase. The codes are often used to easily drive traffic to How to Guides & Instructional Videos. Marketers recognize that once the attention of their audience has been captured, they need to feel empowered to be satisfied with the purchase. For trainers, this applies to providing learners with a simple cheat sheet handout summarizing the key concepts they learned. The cheat sheet should be able to be downloaded anytime, anyplace, anywhere, in formats that meet the always-on culture we live in today.

Next time you tune into your favorite prime time show, watch the messaging; take note of how simply they incorporate music, catchphrases and interesting stories to capture your interest in the moment. Then, think how you can apply this concept when delivering your training program.

 

-Learn more:  http://elmezine.epubxp.com/t/185271-elearning-august-september/13

 

Published in Ideas

BY RUTH VELORIA, EXECUTIVE DEAN, UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX,

If you've ever had the urge to hit the refresh button on your career, you're not alone.

Two-thirds of U.S. working adults sometimes feel their careers are stalled, and more than half have regretted a career misstep, according to a 2016 University of Phoenix School of Business survey.  Nearly half also admit to having no clear plan moving forward.  This is particularly concerning considering that in today's economy professionals are expected to adapt and respond to the rapidly evolving needs of businesses, which often requires advancing their skill sets throughout their careers.

In the 21st century job market, workers are staying in their careers longer than ever, and will likely face the reality that no single degree will meet their employer’s needs for the entirety of their career. Professionals across every industry are looking for courses to help them gain a competitive edge and grow their industry or professional skills to avoid career stagnation.

At all stages of your career, whether you’re just starting out, are a seasoned employee, or nearing retirement, it’s important to acquire new skills related to your job and passions. Expanding your knowledge means more than enhancing your value; it also demonstrates versatility and broadens your options should you decide it’s time to look at not just changing jobs, but changing careers.

Professional development courses can cover a range of management, leadership, marketing, human resources, business operation and technology skills that allow professionals with deep subject knowledge in an industry to get important training in managing people, staff conflicts or processes. Professionals not in a management role might beneft from a better understanding of how to use office productivity tools such as Microsoft Outlook, messaging and presentation software or learn to gather and analyze data to make better informed decisions.

Many working professionals may be intimidated by the time commitment required to pursue a full bachelor or graduate degree program. However, obtaining advanced certificates can be a highly effective option to stay competitive with the job market. Business certificates can provide a deeper exploration into areas such as human resources, project management, health administration, accounting and technology, and are increasingly aligned with industry standards and employer needs. University of Phoenix, for example, works with the Society of Human Resources Management and the National Retail Federation to help ensure programs prepare students to address industry demands.

Understanding the best education option for you takes some honest self-assessment. Examine your own skill gaps by reviewing professional development blogs, web articles and other resources that outline the background you’ll need for the job you desire. Take measure of the knowledge gaps that may threaten your organization’s growth and plot a path to professional development for yourself. Whether you grow your skills by taking on new projects at work for continued on-the-job learning, this underscores your commitment and ability to think strategically. Once the road map is in place, ongoing professional development and training can serve as markers you can follow to put you in a productive, happy and fulfilling workplace destination. Flexible options, online learning and professional development courses can make educational goals achievable and provide professionals with the opportunity to refresh — rather than restart — their careers. Learn more at phoenix.edu/programs/gainful-employment.

Sources: The Harris Poll on behalf of University of Phoenix School of Business, Feb. 29 - Mar. 2, 2016.

Published in Ideas

BY RYAN J. NEGRI, MANAGING DIRECTOR, IRON YARD VENTURES

Outside investment can transform the future of a budding startup. It can take a company from a college dorm room, garage, or even the trunk of a car, and lead it down the path to becoming a multi-million or even billion-dollar corporation. To fund this investment, many entrepreneurs are turning to accelerators. These programs connect startups to venture capitalists who bring in seed money and give startups access to their experience and resources. In many cases, accelerators will provide office space, mentorship and other assets companies need to plant their roots and thrive.

Accelerators are a relatively new concept — according to Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs, more than 70 percent of existing accelerators were founded in 2008 or later. These programs have been helpful in guiding businesses to success. More than three out of every four businesses that participated in an accelerator program have a high survival rate.

According to the Seed Accelerator Ranking Project, one of the top accelerators in the country is Iron Yard Ventures. Founded in 2012, the organization touts its success in investing in more than 50 startup technology companies that have collectively produced hundreds of jobs and built a stream of capital topping $70 million.

Accelerators can be developed for any industry. Iron Yard’s hospitality accelerators, for example, focus on synchronizing top early-stage startups with industry-leading corporations in hospitality and gaming. Tech entrepreneurs connect with mentors, partners, investors and hospitality and casino companies to develop a business plan to success.

It’s this spirit of progress that attracted University of Phoenix. The University views Iron Yard Ventures as a major player when it comes to forward-moving innovation. Connecting talent with the means necessary to reimagine business in a burgeoning tech mecca is a recipe for success and has led to the creation of RedFlint, an innovation experience center that offers a hands-on learning ecosystem developed jointly by the University’s College of Information Systems and Technology and School of Business and Iron Yard Ventures. This trifecta of business development, educational experience and inventive culture will spark innovation and incubate the skills and strategy development necessary to revolutionize business and industry from the inside out.

RedFlint will serve as a testing lab where users will face real-life problems to cultivate creative thinking and develop forward-looking business solutions. Users will incubate concepts through the use of the latest technologies, such as data analytics and digital marketing tools, allowing startups to have an edge and avoid traditional early business mistakes. And with the help of Iron Yard Ventures, RedFlint will accelerate startups by connecting them with the necessary resources, mentoring and connections needed to get of the ground and running.

The path to building and growing a business is evolving and must be more collaborative than ever. RedFlint allows students, businesses and the community to come together to create solutions through new technologies, bringing to life the 21st century model of entrepreneurship and business growth. Learn more about RedFlint at: redfintvegas.com

Sources:

1. Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs; Bridging the “Pioneer Gap”: The Role of Accelerators in Launching High-Impact Enterprises, pg. 5 and 19

2. Iron Yard Ventures; Announcing the Las Vegas Hospitality Accelerator powered by Iron Yard Ventures

3. Iron Yard Ventures; Las Vegas Hospitality Accelerator

Published in Ideas

IT Ignites Technological Reform Across Industries

BY DENNIS BONILLA, EXECUTIVE DEAN, UNIVERSITY OF PHOENIX, COLLEGE OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS & TECHNOLOGY

Ideas are the new currency of business. We live in an era in which anyone with a dream and ambition can take an idea and bring it to life through digital technology. This liberation has fueled the spread of creative and collaborative solutions to daily problems for both businesses and individuals. Routinely, new technologies are being introduced with the potential — for better or worse — to change industries as we know them.

While new technologies are emerging as quickly as the blink of an eye, the U.S. workforce is stalled, impeded by a lack of access to the real-time knowledge and technical skills needed to keep pace with the changing nature of their positions, companies and industries. As technology becomes an increasingly integral part of business, the right training is critical to bridging this gap. If technology is the catalyst that launches industries forward and innovative ideas are the currency of 21st century business, then how do professionals across all industries make themselves more employable? Trough ongoing professional development and certificates.

Certificate programs are an efficient educational opportunity that can replace the potentially daunting prospect of a four-year degree program or graduate school, and allow workers to continue building on their expertise throughout their lives. Depending on the industry, certificates that provide specific skills training and specializations can even be more influential with hiring managers than graduate degrees.

Certificate programs can help garner enhanced opportunities and recognition, while helping professionals keep up with changes in the field. Advanced certificates in IT can help create an accomplished professional, and allow them to go above and beyond their day-to-day responsibilities to see the big picture for their organization.

INCREASING INTERNAL BUSINESS FUNCTIONALITY WITH IT SKILLS

IT certificates aren’t just for professionals in the IT field. IT certificates can help HR understand how to attract and retain the best talent and how to develop programs that lead to a forward-thinking and innovative work environment. An effectively managed HR department is critical for recruiting top talent and firing up the potential of an organization’s workforce. Talent management can be one of the most expensive and important functions a company undertakes. Attracting innovative individuals with diverse skill sets is critical for maintaining a competitive edge. Yet, despite its importance, many organizations’ current HR systems and practices have been in place for years. Enterprise software can quickly become obsolete as new systems ignite change in the industry, putting the business at a competitive disadvantage when trying to recruit.

As technology continues to move HR functions online, it’s imperative these professionals understand how to leverage this technology to support and improve underlying HR processes. IT certificates can help HR professionals understand how to select, implement and control systems and data to increase productivity and profitability.

USING IT TO ENHANCE CUSTOMER SERVICE IN TODAY’S TECHTOPIA

Consumers in the 21st century have hit the jackpot when it comes to customer service experiences. Digital platforms have made it easier for consumers to create their own custom experiences across service industries, including shopping and travel. While this is great for the customer, technology has made it more complicated for industry professionals to monitor feedback and provide the best service experience.

Pursuing IT certificates can help customer service professionals understand customer behavior and preferences, and help them create strategic plans to build loyalty and increase business profitability. If customer service employees can anticipate consumer sentiment and knowledge, interactions can be enhanced to establish better connections and create a more positive customer experience.

EDUCATION IS EVOLVING TO EMPLOYEE NEEDS

For those who want to continue their education and enhance their tech savvy, new learning environments are innovating to allow for professionals to choose not only what they learn, but how they learn. To adapt to the times, many online and brick-and-mortar institutions of higher learning are marshalling resources and creating unique IT certificate programs calibrated to meet employer demands, while also accommodating working-adult students who balance their studies with families and fulltime careers.

For more information about University of Phoenix programs, including on-time completion rates, the median debt incurred by students who completed the program and other important information, please visit: phoenix.edu/programs/ gainful-employment.

Published in Ideas

How to Teach the Missing Basics to Today’s Young Talent

BY BRUCE TULGAN

There is an ever-widening “soft skills gap” in the workforce, especially among the newest young workforce, the second-wave Millennials otherwise known as “Generation Z” (born 1990-2000).

I say this based on more than two decades studying young people in the workplace: The incidence and insistence of managers complaining about the soft skills of their new young workers has risen steadily year after year since we began tracking it in 1993. It affects workers of all ages, but is most prevalent among the newest youngest people in the workforce.

Today’s newest young people in the workplace have so much to offer, yet too many of them are held back because of their weakness in a whole bunch of old-fashioned basics: non-technical skills ranging from “self-awareness” to “people skills,” especially communication, as well as “critical thinking” and “problem solving.”

Here’s the question everybody asks: Are the relatively weaker soft skills of today’s young workers the result of having grown up thinking, learning and communicating while permanently attached to a hand-held supercomputer?

Surely, that is part of the story.

Gen-Zers are the first true “digital natives,” born in a never-ending ocean of information — an information environment defined by wireless Internet ubiquity, wholesale technology integration, infinite content and immediacy. Gen-Zers are always totally plugged in to an endless stream of content and in continuous dialog — forever mixing and matching and manipulating from an infinite array of sources to create and then project back out into the world their own ever-changing personal montage of information, knowledge, meaning and selfhood. They try on personas, virtually. Social media makes it easy to experiment with extreme versions of one persona or another; more or less (or much more) crass means of expression.

Gen-Zers are perfectly accustomed to feeling worldly and ambitious and successful by engaging virtually in an incredibly malleable reality — where the stakes can seem all-important one moment, until the game is lost and reset with the push of a button in a never-ending digital dance, by projecting their uniquely diverse persona(s) in their own highly customized virtual peer ecosystem.

But remember, it’s not just technology that has shaped this generation.

Every bit as much to blame is the helicopter-parenting on steroids that’s been the norm for Gen-Zers. They have spent much of their formative time ensconced in their own highly customized safety zones — the private comfort of protection and resources provided by responsible adults who are always supposed to be looking out for them. As a result, Gen-Zers are neither accustomed nor inclined to conform their attitudes and behavior for an institution or an authority figure (especially a non-parental authority figure).

As a result, a shocking number of young people today simply do not realize just how much “just doing their own thing” makes their attitudes and behavior maladaptive in the real world of the workplace. Most of them simply cannot fathom how much mastering some of the critical soft skills could increase their value as employees — not only right now, but for the remainder of their careers.

—Bruce Tulgan founded Rainmaker Thinking, a management training firm, in 1993. This article is adapted exclusively for Elearning! Magazine from his book of the same title.

Published in Ideas

Extended enterprise learning is defined as training all “non-employees” associated with an organization - essentially all the individuals who play a key role in the success of a company but aren’t on the direct payroll.  A few examples of these groups include distributors, dealers, resellers, partners or agents. These groups are critical to the success of an organization helping the company drive revenue and accelerate growth. Companies often struggle to effectively deliver timely, engaging learning to these groups.

Challenges with extended enterprise learning include the production of the online training courses, the ability to distribute them to relevant audiences efficiently, and access to immediate tracking and performance so you can gauge the expertise of the channel. Sales leaders, product managers, educators and trainers need to create interactive learning experiences and courses easily, and in one platform or technology. Third-party authoring tools, decentralized technologies and development overhead lead to slow delivery of information prior to and during product launches, and ultimately miss profit opportunities.

Providing your extended enterprise learners with a centralized location to engage with your brand and learn the latest product information is a clear benefit. Increased profits, reduced time to market and decreased costs can be measured as a result of the delivery of timely learning programs. Since the distribution of information can be accomplished quickly your organization can continue to reap the benefits of the training content far after it’s been authored.

The Thought Industries platform focuses on four key areas proven to elevate the power of your extended enterprise efforts:

  • Powerful Native Authoring – Built-in authoring tools mean you can create mobile-responsive interactions without the need for third-party authoring software.  You can make updates in minutes and leverage assets such as text, video, slides, images and audio to build training programs your audience will love.  Not only that, but you can put the authoring directly in the hands of your SMEs no matter where they are located.
  • Mobile Optimized Learning and Training Experiences – Lets face it, extended enterprise learners are busy with their full time jobs. They need to learn on-the-go from their tablets, mobile phones and laptops.  Anything you create in the Thought Industries platform is immediately mobile optimized.
  • Cloud Hosted – Yearly release cycles, software installs and licenses are a thing of the past. With modern cloud-based platforms the technology is immediate and product enhancements continuous so you never have to wait to take advantage of new feature releases. 
  • Seamless Data Integrations – Every business large or small have CRMs, HCMs and TMS systems.  These systems need to be immediately aware and updated from your training platform. Track learner milestones, events and progress seamlessly without ever having to download a report.  Webhooks, APIs and SFTP features will securely communicate with your enterprise technologies.

 

At Thought Industries, our Learning Business Platform(TM) helps our clients solve these exact challenges. Everything from authoring online learning experiences to managing users is consolidated under one roof.  Without coding or development, organizations can get to market quickly and distribute timely information from one location to their audiences.

Extended enterprise learning can be an engaging and educational experience for the end user, but it’s only as good as the technology it’s built on. For companies looking to increase profit margins, get to market quicker and fully engage their external networks, be sure you are leveraging the latest tools and technologies in order to maximize the value of your channel.

For more information about Thought Industries and our Learning Business Platform(TM), feel free to reach out to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or request your personalized demo here.

Stephen Newman is the Director of Marketing at Thought Industries, a cloud-based provider of online learning technology for enterprise organizations. Learn more at www.thoughtindustries.com.

 

 

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