Twitter-LinkedIn Honeymoon Over

Last week’s announcement that Twitter updates will no longer automatically sync with LinkedIn accounts signaled an end to the honeymoon that had existed for almost three years between the two social media sites. Previously, users could opt to have all tweets, or just those tagged with the hashtag #in or #li, flow directly onto their LinkedIn profile pages.

CBS says that cutting off tweets to LinkedIn users “is part of a greater initiative at Twitter to create stricter requirements for developers who use the company’s application programming interface (API).”

The new requirements are meant to encourage developers to build apps on Twitter’s Website. The company said it would “more thoroughly enforce” its Developer Rules of the Road. Twitter wants to ensure its branding is consistent across the Internet, whether tweets are read on the site or a third-party client.

The move seems to be Twitter’s latest effort to get users to stick around, rather than using Twitter merely as a portal to content elsewhere on the web. Originally a text-only service, Twitter has evolved to allow users to embed video and photo content from various sites around the Web. Twitter’s latest implementation, called Twitter Cards, will display headlines, photos, bylines and teaser blurbs for articles and other content around the Web.

In a blog post headlined “Delivering a consistent Twitter experience.” Twitter product director Michael Sippey says the company planns to crack down on third-party apps and services that too closely mimicked Twitter itself. Here’s what he wrote:

“Ultimately, we want to make sure that the Twitter experience is straightforward and easy to understand. We’re building tools for publishers and investing more and more in our own apps to ensure that you have a great experience everywhere you experience Twitter, no matter what device you’re using. You need to be able to see expanded Tweets and other features that make Twitter more engaging and easier to use. These are the features that bring people closer to the things they care about. These are the features that make Twitter Twitter.”

“The intent is clear,” Marcus Wohlsen of Wired magazine wrote. “Twitter wants to gain more Apple-like control over the Twitter user experience. Like Apple, Twitter wants to have the final say. The company doesn’t want Twitter to mean LinkedIn or TweetBot or whatever other platform users are using to read and post tweets. They want Twitter to mean Twitter.”

Chris Barth of Forbes notes that many developers see this as the latest change from a company that already has a shaky history with third-party applications. Barth cites one developer who wrote: “I’m done developing for Twitter. They’ve demonstrated not once to me, but twice, that they have no desire to work with developers, but rather antagonize them as they see fit.”

The little bit of good news for users comes with the realization that they will still be able to post updates to Twitter from LinkedIn — just not the other way around.

Last week’s announcement that Twitter updates will no longer automatically sync with LinkedIn accounts signaled an end to the honeymoon that had existed for almost three years between the two social media sites. Previously, users could opt to have all tweets, or just those tagged with the hashtag #in or #li, flow directly onto their LinkedIn profile pages.

CBS says that cutting off tweets to LinkedIn users “is part of a greater initiative at Twitter to create stricter requirements for developers who use the company’s application programming interface (API).”

The new requirements are meant to encourage developers to build apps on Twitter’s Website. The company said it would “more thoroughly enforce” its Developer Rules of the Road. Twitter wants to ensure its branding is consistent across the Internet, whether tweets are read on the site or a third-party client.

The move seems to be Twitter’s latest effort to get users to stick around, rather than using Twitter merely as a portal to content elsewhere on the web. Originally a text-only service, Twitter has evolved to allow users to embed video and photo content from various sites around the Web. Twitter’s latest implementation, called Twitter Cards, will display headlines, photos, bylines and teaser blurbs for articles and other content around the Web.

In a blog post headlined “Delivering a consistent Twitter experience.” Twitter product director Michael Sippey says the company planns to crack down on third-party apps and services that too closely mimicked Twitter itself. Here’s what he wrote:

“Ultimately, we want to make sure that the Twitter experience is straightforward and easy to understand. We’re building tools for publishers and investing more and more in our own apps to ensure that you have a great experience everywhere you experience Twitter, no matter what device you’re using. You need to be able to see expanded Tweets and other features that make Twitter more engaging and easier to use. These are the features that bring people closer to the things they care about. These are the features that make Twitter Twitter.”

“The intent is clear,” Marcus Wohlsen of Wired magazine wrote. “Twitter wants to gain more Apple-like control over the Twitter user experience. Like Apple, Twitter wants to have the final say. The company doesn’t want Twitter to mean LinkedIn or TweetBot or whatever other platform users are using to read and post tweets. They want Twitter to mean Twitter.”

Chris Barth of Forbes notes that many developers see this as the latest change from a company that already has a shaky history with third-party applications. Barth cites one developer who wrote: “I’m done developing for Twitter. They’ve demonstrated not once to me, but twice, that they have no desire to work with developers, but rather antagonize them as they see fit.”

The little bit of good news for users comes with the realization that they will still be able to post updates to Twitter from LinkedIn — just not the other way around.

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