‘Virtual Computers’ On the Horizon?

Imagine a relatively inexpensive, light, thin-client device that accesses your data center from anywhere, takes on the image of a typical desktop, provides all the appropriate data and applications you need throughout the day, and then reverts instantly to the proverbial tabula rasa when shut down — or when the power goes out. And, since no data is stored on the device, there is no risk of having proprietary data fall into the wrong hands if the device is lost or stolen. The virtual desktop interface (VDI) can be just that.

Five Reasons Your Next Desktop Will Be Virtual:

(1) Hard-cost savings, plus they last longer (six to seven years versus four years for a notebook), and they consume a fraction of the energy of a desktop PC (as low as 6 to 7 watts for thin clients vs. 150 watts for PCs).

(2) Ease of management. Thin clients are easier to patch and upgrade, and they have slower generational changes than PCs, so you’re not swapping out newer versions all the time.

(3) Centralized backups, which is easier on data center operations and eliminates local drive issues.

(4) Regulatory compliance: Since all the data and applications are centralized, VDI makes it vastly easier to enable and enforce processes and procedures to ensure security, privacy and other best practices.

(5) Productivity gains through telecommuting or remote working and decreasing demands on help desks.

Imagine a relatively inexpensive, light, thin-client device that accesses your data center from anywhere, takes on the image of a typical desktop, provides all the appropriate data and applications you need throughout the day, and then reverts instantly to the proverbial tabula rasa when shut down — or when the power goes out. And, since no data is stored on the device, there is no risk of having proprietary data fall into the wrong hands if the device is lost or stolen. The virtual desktop interface (VDI) can be just that.

Five Reasons Your Next Desktop Will Be Virtual:

(1) Hard-cost savings, plus they last longer (six to seven years versus four years for a notebook), and they consume a fraction of the energy of a desktop PC (as low as 6 to 7 watts for thin clients vs. 150 watts for PCs).

(2) Ease of management. Thin clients are easier to patch and upgrade, and they have slower generational changes than PCs, so you’re not swapping out newer versions all the time.

(3) Centralized backups, which is easier on data center operations and eliminates local drive issues.

(4) Regulatory compliance: Since all the data and applications are centralized, VDI makes it vastly easier to enable and enforce processes and procedures to ensure security, privacy and other best practices.

(5) Productivity gains through telecommuting or remote working and decreasing demands on help desks.

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