L&D Professionals Must Re-Assess

Workplace learning expert Laura Overton has appealed to learning and development (L&D) professionals to re-assess current orthodoxies and seize opportunities for learners to connect, share and communicate with each other.

The managing director of Towards Maturity believes L&D has been slow to utilize technological advances in society at large, and that it has been guilty of being transactional rather than transformational.

“In the last 10 years, we’ve seen the advent of Facebook and Twitter, and just almost everybody knows how to Google something or how to purchase something online,”
she notes. “But what we’ve been doing in learning and development to date, I believe, has been more about automating what we used to do.

“I think one of the key questions that we need to ask ourselves in the future is, ‘How can we actually facilitate that fast exchange of knowledge and information
in new ways and with new models?’”

Overton also considers attitude just as important as technology in delivering the workforce of tomorrow: “There has to be an innovation of mindset, moving from the course to delivering performance in the organisation, and being completely unconstrained by the past and looking to the future. I think that’s going to be the real innovation that will make the difference.”

—View the interviews: www.brightwave.co.uk/what-a-difference/video

Workplace learning expert Laura Overton has appealed to learning and development (L&D) professionals to re-assess current orthodoxies and seize opportunities for learners to connect, share and communicate with each other.

The managing director of Towards Maturity believes L&D has been slow to utilize technological advances in society at large, and that it has been guilty of being transactional rather than transformational.

“In the last 10 years, we’ve seen the advent of Facebook and Twitter, and just almost everybody knows how to Google something or how to purchase something online,”
she notes. “But what we’ve been doing in learning and development to date, I believe, has been more about automating what we used to do.

“I think one of the key questions that we need to ask ourselves in the future is, ‘How can we actually facilitate that fast exchange of knowledge and information
in new ways and with new models?’”

Overton also considers attitude just as important as technology in delivering the workforce of tomorrow: “There has to be an innovation of mindset, moving from the course to delivering performance in the organisation, and being completely unconstrained by the past and looking to the future. I think that’s going to be the real innovation that will make the difference.”

—View the interviews: www.brightwave.co.uk/what-a-difference/video

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