Skills development is a top concern of Learning and Development (L&D) professionals and business leaders — and 69% of L&D leaders say talent development is their top priority. That’s why D2L has added rubrics for employees and managers in the new Magenta release. Rubrics are a tool that instructors leverage to create consistency and set clear expectations for their learners. Soft skills and good-quality feedback can be hard to assess — and measuring skills can be a key ingredient in helping employees continue to progress in their careers. With the Magenta release, Brightspace makes it easier for organizations to evaluate employee skills and provide clear and transparent feedback.

The Magenta Release includes the following powerful features for businesses and organizations:

>> A new user experience for rubrics makes it easier to evaluate employee learning and give clear and transparent feedback. Rubrics also help give more timely feedback to employees, allowing instructors to more quickly identify their learning needs.

>> The ability to assign and assess learning happening outside the digital environment— like presentations, skill demonstrations, or field work — providing an easy way to handle feedback and assessment in the moment.

>> Powerful new data and analytics tools — Magenta’s new Data Solutions Consulting packages help users focus on defining data-driven goals, completing a needs analysis and feasibility study and building a data solution required to gain insights and answer identified business problems.

>> A course adventure pack makes it easy for learning and development managers to create content integrating gamebased learning, storytelling, interactive assessment and awards leaderboard elements into training material to help improve employee engagement, retention, achievement and outcomes.

>> Improvements to quizzing — including a dynamic preview for question pools in quizzes, and more data on quiz attempts with character counts on quiz logs help to streamline the quiz- creation experience.

>> A Manager Dashboard helps keep employees on track by setting due dates and clear expectations for assignments. Employees can stay also stay better organized and navigate to their courses quickly by having their course cards grouped by role or department.

WHAT CORPORATE USERS ARE SAYING

“Our primary focus isn’t tests and written assignments—it’s asking students to demonstrate their coaching philosophy and how they put it into practice as they work with their athletes. Brightspace gives us a better way for them to capture those experiences and share them with their fellow students and mentors—for example, by making and sharing videos,” says Jason Sjostrom, Director of Coaching, Canadian Sports Institute Calgary.

“Now with one system in place on the Brightspace platform, we can track customers’ learning progress, which helps keep them on task. We also leverage D2L’s intelligent agents in almost all our live courses, which allows us to easily communicate directly with customers and large numbers of course registrants within the platform. Having a system that
allows you to reach out when you need to at certain points of a course, send reminders, and get people moving in the right direction or drive them to discussion boards is very important for our association and our members,” says Nancy Robert, former Executive Vice President, Chief Product & Marketing Officer, American Nurses Association.

“Brightspace allows us to provide rich content, improve an employee’s opportunities and improve their ability to execute while still allowing them the freedom to do their day-to-day work. This earns buyin from managers and employees alike and makes adopting a new learning program easier for the entire organization,” says Lisa Cairns, Director of E-Learning, Smith.

ABOUT BRIGHTSPACE

Brightspace is a cloud-based learning platform that makes online and blended learning easy, flexible and smart. Brightspace is a quantum leap beyond LMS – it is easy to drag-and-drop content to create engaging courses, supports all mobile devices, has industry-leading uptime and is accessible for all learners. Plus, Brightspace enables the future of learning with a gaming engine, adaptive learning, video management, intelligent agents, templated interactives for course design, full support for outcomes or competency-based learning, and actionable learning analytics.

D2L has transformed the way millions of people learn online and in the classroom. Learn more about D2L for businesses at www.D2L.com.

Published in New Products

According to TechNavio, the artificial intelligence market will top $968.02 billion by 2022. Health-care applications will lead A.I. revenues with 15% market share. Deep Learning segment will grow 50%. And, the Americas will account for 38.5% of the A.I. market.

Source: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170516006055/en/Global-Artificial-Intelligence-MarketGrow-CAGR-51

Global A.I. to Grow

Published in Trends

Despite earning more bachelor’s degrees, negotiating equal salaries, and staying in the workforce like men, women remain underrepresented across all categories in business, reports McKinsey Group and LeanIn.org Study.

"This [disparity] should serve as a wake-up call: until companies close the early gaps in hiring and promotion, women will remain underrepresented," cites the authors. Download complete report at: https://www.mckinsey.com/featured-sights/gender-equality/women-in-the-workplace-2018?

Women Lag in Senior Roles

Published in Trends

Augmented reality, mobile and collaborative solutions top the list of fastest growing learning technologies learning leaders plan to deploy according to the 2018 Learning & TalentPlatforms Study conducted by Elearning! Magazine.

Fastest 1

Published in Trends

The Fosway 9-Grids assists HR leaders in making informed decisions around their solution choices. It compares solutions based on their Performance, Potential, Market Presence, Total Cost of Ownership and Future Trajectory. Workday and Cornerstone also named 2018 Best of Elearning! honorees.

Fosway Ranks HCM Cloud SolutionsFosway Ranks HCM Cloud Solutions2

Published in Latest News

Linking process improvements to business strategy is the top challenge for senior leaders in the year ahead according to PEX 2018 Report. Sustaining change (30%), ensuring customer focus (22%), overcoming short term focus (22%), and deploying new technologies (21%) round out the top 5 challenges. Skill shortage (10%), lack of alignment between business and departments (12%) and maintaining executive buy-in (16%) completed the list of concerns. To view complete report, 

Visit: https://register.processexcellencenetwork.com/pex-annualreport-2018-email-only/
Source: PEX 2018 Report 

Top Business

Published in Latest News

It’s been 14 years since the birth of the Best of Elearning! Awards. The first edition in 2005 featured 9 categories, 29 brands receiving 245 nominations. The 2005 class included GeoLearning, Centra, WebEx, Books 24x7, and Adobe. Many of these brands still reign under different owners. Yet, they represented the need for SaaS or Cloud systems, learner-directed online learning, and effective e-learning development tools. A lot has changed….yet much has stayed the same. In 2005, 49% of learning professionals reported they had referred an e-learning brand to a peer. In 2018, that figure is 85%. Professionals still look to trusted resources for information. The Best of Elearning! Awards were launched in 2005 to formalize this recommendation process through its online user’s choice awards format.

In 2018, the Best of Elearning! Awards recognized 73 brands across 23 categories with thousands of nominations counted. This year 20% of the brands are new to the awards program — continuing to inspire us with constant innovation. We welcome Strivr VR, Sumarian, Modest Tree, Brainier, and other first time honorees to the Best of Elearning! family.

We are entering an exciting time in the learning technology industry. We see Artificial Intelligence powered knowledge and data systems. Machine Learning enabling professionals to focus on strategic actions versus rote activities. Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality are entering the mainstream with Healthcare and Entertainment applications leading the way.

The heavy lifting in learning technology still lies at the feet of the stalwart brands that continue to innovate, evolve and inspire talent. These brands include Adobe, SumTotal Systems, a Skillsoft Company, Cisco WebEx, and Articulate who have earned honors every year since 2005.

We can’t forget the editors who have brought you these 14 years of innovation. John Watson, Jack Gordon and Jerry Roche have brought Elearning! Magazine to life — Earning 24 editorial, design, website and eNewsletter honors for excellence from the Western Publishing Association.

Thank you to you all who have voted for the Best of Elearning! this year or in the past. Thank you to the technologists and solution providers who innovate and inspire. And, a big thank you to John, Jack and Jerry for making it all happen.

Published in Insights

Learning leaders are continually challenged to meet the changing needs of their internal learners and business partners. There’s a constant need to evaluate and balance learner needs and prioritizing learning and development programs that drive meaningful business results. With unemployment at a 30-year low, many organizations are struggling with attracting and retaining talent. Immediately and in the many years to come, Chief Learning and Talent Officers will need to shift their focus on cultivating talent internally to developing and executing on strategies externally.

While many organizations may have strategies and resources dedicated to college campus or trade school recruitment, a new focus of developing a talent pipeline through high school relationships and apprenticeships is essential. There is value in exposing high school students to career pathing and/or apprenticeship programs early-on as there is a potential to combine work-based, on-the-job learning with relevant technical education in the classroom. Students who participate in these programs may graduate with a high school diploma, real work experience, and in some cases, earn college credits, and industry credentials. They also start on a career path that continues after high school graduation – whether that is a continuation of their employment, along with college, college only, apprenticeship only, or other full-time employment.

LEADING WITH STRENGTH
Vi invests heavily in talent development with the goal of leveraging Vi’s commitment to a learning as part of the company’s value proposition to attract and retain talent. In fact, many of Vi’s leaders joined the company in high school and have taken advantage of the company’s front-line Management Development Program, tuition reimbursement program, and certification programs to pursue careers in hospitality, nursing or general management. Nonetheless, with the growing challenges of hiring hospitality and healthcare talent, Vi has shifted efforts and strategies to cultivate interest in health care and hospitality careers with high school students leveraging and refining Vi’s strengths in learning and organizational development.

Leaders view

WHY WAS THIS SHIFT NECESSARY?
As the population in the United States ages, the senior living industry will add nearly 350,000 jobs by 2025 and senior living employment will exceed 1.1 million according to Argentum, the nation’s largest senior living industry association. To meet these needs, Argentum states that the senior living industry will need to recruit 1.2 million new employees by 2025. And this is just one segment of the healthcare industry. According to the Work Institute, the healthcare industry employs over 12% of the U.S. workforce ratio of health-care job openings to available health-care workers of 2 to 1. Additionally, Vi competes heavily for culinary and dining services professionals to serve Vi’s residents. And, with 14 million U.S. restaurant workers, there’s simply not enough applicants to fill jobs.

STRATEGIES LEVERAGED
Working with Vi’s culinary and nursing teams, Vi developed career ladders for culinary and entrylevel nursing positions. Vi’scareer ladder allows existing employees to drive their own career path by achieving specific skills through company-sponsored training programs and mentoring. An employee’s ability to progress through the career ladder is not limited to an open position — rather achievement of defined and demonstrated skills by role. Vi’s career ladder alongside the company’s Management Development Program and tuition reimbursement program provides Vi the value proposition necessary to be potentially be relevant to high school students.

Towards cultivating high school talent, Vi has created a specific career page and recruitment materials to not only paint a clear picture of career paths at Vi, but to also spark interest in meaningful work of making a difference in the lives of older adults.  Vi intends to expand community outreach to high schools and continue pursuit of apprenticeship programs.

IMPORTANCE OF PARTNERSHIPS – NOT ALONE
With the growing labor shortages, Chief Learning and Talent Officers do not need to tackle these challenges alone — leverage professional organizations and associations.

Vi joined Argentum’s recently launched “Senior Living Works” along with other senior living organizations. Senior Living Works is designed to support recruitment, retention, and training needed across the senior living industry — also known as “Careers in Caring.”  “Senior Living Works” initial launch included a website and a Recruitment Engagement Toolkit, with a range of resources to support connections with high schools,technical schools, community colleges, and universities.https://seniorliving.works/

Talent leaders should also consider organizations such as the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL), a 501(c)3 non-profit organization with more than 40 years of experience in workforce learning, including 30 years of experience working directly with employers of all sizes across multiple industries to create and deliver effective talent management strategies. From developing best-in-class career pathing software, to creating career and education advising programs for employees, to targeted consulting, CAEL works with leading companies across all industries to help them maximize their investments in learning and talent management for their entire talent pipeline. CAEL has worked directly with employers to plan and deliver innovative and impactful learning and talent management strategies that target all employees -- including the frontline and mid-level workforce. Companies use CAEL’s services to recruit, retain and engage their employees, and ultimately benefit from a pipeline of “right-fit” workers prepared to support their growth strategies. https://www.cael.org/

COLLABORATION IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN EVER
We’re at the intersection of talent acquisition and talent development. While many learning leaders have developed leading learning solutions to increase productivity, sales, decrease expenses, accidents, improve quality, and/or develop leaders, it’s clear the labor shortage isn’t going away anytime soon. Collaboration between an organization’s chief Talent Acquisition and learning leaders alongside their business partners is now more important than ever to cultivate and develop talent.

Published in Insights

Insights and Practical Guidance from the Field

A little more than 30 years ago—at the time when the first micro-computers arrived in the workplace—my career began in learning and development (L&D). It was very exciting to experience the first generation of computer-based training solutions and even the computer-based "management games" that were introduced for leadership development. In those days, the L&D function was called "training," and most efforts were mandated for the workforce and focused on technical skills and training initiatives.

Almost all training was delivered in a classroom or conference center, and research on people-capa-bility building and corporate training was at a preliminary stage. Fast-forward to today. We are at the beginning of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, which is fueled by advancements in technologies, such as the Internet of Things, machine learning, robots, the autonomous car, 3-D printing, and the mobile Internet, to name a few. All these technologies have already had tremendous impact on what is required of people capabilities in organizations. The world and the workplace have changed dramatically. The good old personal computer has been replaced by the smartphone. It seems like the Internet
has always been around: people work virtually from a variety of locations, technology has introduced and disrupted many business models, and IT has gained dominance over the way we work.

Today, training has evolved into L&D. Organizations that want to stay in business have realized they must continually invest in the development of their human capital, and about 45 percent of all today’s formal learning is delivered through digital solutions. In many cases, these channels have replaced traditional classroom programs. Technology enables learning to be even more personalized and self-directed. The classroom of the 21st century is enabled by technology and provides people with immersive-learning experiences. The future is about high-tech and high-touch learning. Young professionals and leaders have told us that they benefit tremendously from time away from daily work, where they can collaboratively solve wicked problems, practice new skills, receive coaching, connect and learn from others, get inspired by new insights, and reflect on their own work and personal development. Additionally, individuals have realized that they need to embrace lifelong learning mind-sets to remain relevant and that their careers will involve multiple employers and roles.

Research in multiple fields has contributed significantly to the L&D profession. Thanks to cognitive neuroscience we know more about how the brain works and how people learn. This research has provided evidence that because of the brain’s neuroplasticity, people can continue to learn and grow throughout their lifetime. Many universities have performed ground-breaking research in the broader field of adult learning, and L&D professionals benefit tremendously from these insights on how to design the most effective and efficient learning solutions. We also have a better understanding from developmental psychology research on what it takes to change people's behaviors. Finally, the very promising field of positive psychology looks at what enables organizations and people to flourish, and these insights have been incorporated into the design of learning programs.

The defining attributes of the 21st-century economy and fourth industrial revolution are innovation, technology, globalization, and a rapid pace of change. Therefore, an organization’s capacity to enhance the capabilities of its workforce and create a culture of continuous learning are vital to remaining competitive. These trends make an effective learning-and-development (L&D) function more critical than ever. I am the editor and co-author of this book, a compendium of 20 chapters co-authored by McKinsey L&D experts and colleagues. It addresses a range of topics essential to the future of L&D, including function structure and governance, digital learning, and developing lifelong learning mind-sets, among others.

I am very gratified that over the past 30 years L&D has also matured as a profession. There are now several bachelor's, master's, and doctorate university degrees offered in this field, and a growing number of companies have acknowledged that L&D is a vital profession, akin to accounting, IT, and marketing. In these organizations, the role of a chief learning officer has become accepted, and the people appointed to lead L&D are specialists in this broad field of knowledge and expertise.

It has been an amazing personal journey to watch the L&D profession make such an impact over the years. As I am passionate about how I can advance the profession, I reached out to my colleagues and invited them to co-author this book, Elevating Learning & Development: Insights and Practical Guidance. It focuses on a variety of learning topics that matter to every L&D professional. The book includes an introduction and 19 chapters with terrific perspectives from leading McKinsey L&D practitioners and thought leaders. This compendium of articles discusses every facet of professional development and training— from ensuring that L&D's efforts are closely aligned with business strategy to elements of advancing the L&D function, designing learning solutions, deploying digital learning, executing flawlessly, measuring impact, and ensuring good governance. I couldn’t be prouder or more appreciative of all the amazing work that this team has accomplished, and I am delighted to present this book to you. For L&D professionals seeking to hone their organization's efforts, Elevating Learning & Development: Insights and Practical Guidance from the Field is the ideal resource and I hope that you and your colleagues will benefit.

All royalties from this book will be donated to the foundation: (http://www.e-learningforkids.org/) which has provided over 20 million children (age 5-12) with free access to digital learning (online/offline) in elementary school subjects including Math, Science, Language Arts, Computers, Life and Health Skills.

On behalf of the E-learning for Kids Foundation, I want to thank you for purchasing this book. 

Published in Insights

BY JOCELYN GAJEWAY, TECHNICAL TRAINING SPECIALIST, NASA’S JET PROPULSION LABORATORY

Typically, when presented with a new project, learning professionals tend to use either a waterfall method or a modified iterative approach to develop the system and materials. These approaches remain best practices when working with content that is in a relatively complete state at the time development begins, but are not nimble enough to keep up with some project’s rapid development and release cycles. Structuring the development to an AGILE framework seems like the next most logical choice, but when speaking with colleagues, it seems as though it was making additional work, and sending teams back to square one with every sprint. How, then, to take advantage of integrating the development of training with the content without falling into the trap of starting over every month?

THE MISSION 
In June of 2017, I was presented with the opportunity to collaborate with the Mars 2020 project as they began development of the Rover Mission Operations Training System. When I started, I learned that many of the roles, tools, and processes for Mars 2020 were under development. Meaning neither of these approaches would be flexible enough to keep up. Instead, after an initial extensive needs analysis and curriculum design phase, each phase of development would be in short cycles targeted to iterations and development of training for each release. This prevented the rebuilding the entire program with each change, enabled rapid implementation of changes based upon learner feedback, and provided current and highly specific training materials throughout the life of the  training program.

As we began, it became apparent that in order to develop the flexible, scalable program, we needed to hold in-depth interviews with subject matter experts, team leads and other supervisors, [role archetypes] with experience performing similar tasks on other flight projects. It was critical to involve them in the development of the new tools and processes. These interviews delved into the skills and knowledge required to perform the dayto-day duties of the job, including the unspoken “soft skills” exercised regularly, rather than a strict task analysis. These interviews and the resulting analyses formed the foundation of the competency-based curricula for each role.

The competency-based approach allows the development of the course material to proceed at the same pace as the development of tools and processes, with the same outcomes.

At the same time, refinement of training content is linked to new software features. Revisions to the initial source content are aligned to the planned feature releases for the development sprints, and the changes are made using either ADDIE or a modified iterative approach, allowing instructionally sound content to be developed and deployed. This also allows the training content to scale to the project’s needs. The training content is always complete and current to the state of tools and processes are in development.

Of course, running parallel to this sprint style development is a slower, more traditional development cycle for the tatic content, mostly foundational knowledge considered “nice to have”, rather than a critical skill. This was actually one of the most interesting takeaways from the interview period. Background knowledge is ultimately required for a trainee to be proficient in their role, but it is possible to structure the training flow and pipeline to allow new trainees to reach basic qualification and begin to work in their roles in a shorter timeframe. Prioritizing the development of roles and topics in this manner allows the training system as a whole to be more efficient, creating a steady pipeline of qualified individuals. Having enough qualified personnel means that there is also room for additional refresher and advanced training to continue throughout the project without affecting operations.

In order to develop a truly effective training system, training cannot be an afterthought, shoehorned in at just before release. Instead, the paradigm of training development needs to shift to more flexible processes, allowing learning professionals to be a part of the team, to truly understand the user stories and outcomes, and develop effective, engaging content to support those needs.

Typically, when presented
with a new project, learning
professionals tend to use either a
waterfall method or a modified
iterative approach to develop the
system and materials. These approaches
remain
best
practices

when
working
with
content
that

is
in a relatively
complete
state

at
the
time
development
begins,

but
are
not
nimble
enough
to

keep
up
with
some
project’s

rapid
development
and
release

cycles.
Structuring
the
development
to
an
AGILE
framework

seems
like
the
next
most
logical

choice,
but
when
speaking
with

colleagues,
it
seems
as
though

it
was
making
additional
work,

and
sending
teams
back
to

square
one
with
every
sprint.

How,
then,
to
take
advantage
of

integrating
the
development
of

training
with
the
content
without
falling
into
the
trap
of
starting
over
every
month?
Published in Top Stories
Page 1 of 38

 


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