U.S. E-learning Market Reaches $16.7 Billion

The U.S. market for self-paced e-learning will reach $16.7 billion in 2009, according to a new report by Ambient Insight. The report suggests that the demand for online training is growing by 7.4 percent and revenues will reach $23.8 billion by 2014.

“In the past two years, the rate of growth for online learning products has slowed,” reports chief research officer Sam S. Adkins. “Yet, despite the recession, and in many cases, because of it, the demand is positive in all the online learning buyer segments. There are distinct revenue opportunities in each of the buyer segments.”

“We see the highest growth rate in the health-care segment, followed by PreK-12 and higher education,” adds CEO Tyson Greer. “The health-care industry has been recession resilient and online training suppliers competing in that segment have been relatively immune from recessionary pressures. The rate of growth in the academic segments is due in part to the success and proliferation of the for-profit online schools.”

“The good news is that there are still large untapped revenues for suppliers,” adds Adkins. “For example, small and medium business (SMB) buyers were slow to adopt online training until the recent recession. There is now a relatively healthy demand for self-paced e-learning products and services in the SMB segments.”

This report forecasts e-learning and online training expenditures by eight buyer segments: consumer; corporations; federal government; state and local government; PreK-12 academic; higher education; non-profits and associations; and healthcare. Corporations will be the top online training buyers throughout the forecast period, followed by higher education and the PreK-12 e-learning buyers.

The U.S. market for self-paced e-learning will reach $16.7 billion in 2009, according to a new report by Ambient Insight. The report suggests that the demand for online training is growing by 7.4 percent and revenues will reach $23.8 billion by 2014.

“In the past two years, the rate of growth for online learning products has slowed,” reports chief research officer Sam S. Adkins. “Yet, despite the recession, and in many cases, because of it, the demand is positive in all the online learning buyer segments. There are distinct revenue opportunities in each of the buyer segments.”

“We see the highest growth rate in the health-care segment, followed by PreK-12 and higher education,” adds CEO Tyson Greer. “The health-care industry has been recession resilient and online training suppliers competing in that segment have been relatively immune from recessionary pressures. The rate of growth in the academic segments is due in part to the success and proliferation of the for-profit online schools.”

“The good news is that there are still large untapped revenues for suppliers,” adds Adkins. “For example, small and medium business (SMB) buyers were slow to adopt online training until the recent recession. There is now a relatively healthy demand for self-paced e-learning products and services in the SMB segments.”

This report forecasts e-learning and online training expenditures by eight buyer segments: consumer; corporations; federal government; state and local government; PreK-12 academic; higher education; non-profits and associations; and healthcare. Corporations will be the top online training buyers throughout the forecast period, followed by higher education and the PreK-12 e-learning buyers.

Leave a reply