CareerBuilder’s Survey Finds Skills Gap and Increasing Competition for Top Talent in U.S.

In a recent survey, the recruiting firm CareerBuilder discovered that the demand for talent in the U.S. is reaching pre-recession levels. The survey estimates that 30 percent of employers are going to hire new permanent staff in the second quarter of 2012. This is a 28 percent increase over the same period in 2011. One-third of employers added full-time, permanent employees in the first quarter of 2012. This is the highest rate increase that has been reported since the economic downturn began in 2007.

But employers still struggle to find highly skilled employees. While nearly 13 million people are unemployed in the U.S., 31 percent of employers surveyed say they have jobs standing open which they cannot fill. This lack is slowing overall growth in these companies. An estimated 15 percent of employers reported that since they cannot fill these highly skilled positions, they also cannot create the lower skilled positions that would support these roles.

Employers who cannot recruit employees with the skills they need will increasingly have to train their existing employees to fill these roles wherever possible. But for highly skilled positions in engineering and medicine, this will not be possible.

Source: CareerBuilder, Inc.

http://www.careerbuilder.com

In a recent survey, the recruiting firm CareerBuilder discovered that the demand for talent in the U.S. is reaching pre-recession levels. The survey estimates that 30 percent of employers are going to hire new permanent staff in the second quarter of 2012. This is a 28 percent increase over the same period in 2011. One-third of employers added full-time, permanent employees in the first quarter of 2012. This is the highest rate increase that has been reported since the economic downturn began in 2007.

But employers still struggle to find highly skilled employees. While nearly 13 million people are unemployed in the U.S., 31 percent of employers surveyed say they have jobs standing open which they cannot fill. This lack is slowing overall growth in these companies. An estimated 15 percent of employers reported that since they cannot fill these highly skilled positions, they also cannot create the lower skilled positions that would support these roles.

Employers who cannot recruit employees with the skills they need will increasingly have to train their existing employees to fill these roles wherever possible. But for highly skilled positions in engineering and medicine, this will not be possible.

Source: CareerBuilder, Inc.

http://www.careerbuilder.com

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