Embracing Outcome-based Digital Learning

Junior Achievement (JA) will convene the first meeting of its Digital Strategy Advisory Task Force in the Washington, D.C., area this week. The Task Force will define an action plan around the use of technology in JA’s future program development and delivery, with a goal of applying the learning to drive systemic change in K-12 work-readiness education.

Leveraging social media and online delivery systems may encourage students to more actively engage with educational content delivered via those channels.

A recent Pew Research Center survey showed that 93 percent of teens ages 12-17 go online; 62 percent use the internet to access information on news and politics. And results from a December 2009 poll by Deloitte and Junior Achievement showed that 88 percent of teens surveyed use social networks every day, with 70 percent saying they participate in social networking an hour or more daily.

The Task Force will be asked to address two key outcomes:

1) Establishing a digital strategy around the use of multiple mediums in the development of programs.

2) Recommendations around how the organization can effectively scale its use of business volunteers to deliver programs by leveraging technology.

Jack Kosakowski, president of Junior Achievement USA, notes: “We’re excited to engage leaders in both the education and technology sectors to collaboratively define JA’s leadership position in the delivery of educational digital content. We look forward to expanding JA’s scope both in terms of student reach and volunteer engagement, with compelling and relevant programs in our three content areas — work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy.”

Junior Achievement is the world’s largest organization dedicated to inspiring and preparing young people to succeed in a global economy. For more information, visit www.ja.org.

Junior Achievement (JA) will convene the first meeting of its Digital Strategy Advisory Task Force in the Washington, D.C., area this week. The Task Force will define an action plan around the use of technology in JA’s future program development and delivery, with a goal of applying the learning to drive systemic change in K-12 work-readiness education.

Leveraging social media and online delivery systems may encourage students to more actively engage with educational content delivered via those channels.

A recent Pew Research Center survey showed that 93 percent of teens ages 12-17 go online; 62 percent use the internet to access information on news and politics. And results from a December 2009 poll by Deloitte and Junior Achievement showed that 88 percent of teens surveyed use social networks every day, with 70 percent saying they participate in social networking an hour or more daily.

The Task Force will be asked to address two key outcomes:

1) Establishing a digital strategy around the use of multiple mediums in the development of programs.

2) Recommendations around how the organization can effectively scale its use of business volunteers to deliver programs by leveraging technology.

Jack Kosakowski, president of Junior Achievement USA, notes: “We’re excited to engage leaders in both the education and technology sectors to collaboratively define JA’s leadership position in the delivery of educational digital content. We look forward to expanding JA’s scope both in terms of student reach and volunteer engagement, with compelling and relevant programs in our three content areas — work readiness, entrepreneurship and financial literacy.”

Junior Achievement is the world’s largest organization dedicated to inspiring and preparing young people to succeed in a global economy. For more information, visit www.ja.org.

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