Gaming Expo Begins Today

The Electronic Entertainment Expo kicks off today in Los Angeles, and a big topic of conversation will be how the virtual world and 3-D video formats will be changing over the next few years.

“With groundbreaking announcements expected from computer and video game publishers and developers, this year’s E3 Expo is going to be the main event for the entertainment industry in 2010,” says Michael D. Gallagher, president and CEO of the Entertainment Software Association, which represents U.S. computer and video game publishers and owns E3 Expo. “Major retailers, investor analyst firms and media from the United States and more than 60 countries are already committed to attending.”

Some of the learning-related stories that may develop this week:

>> MicroSoft’s launch of Natel, a PC-based visualization game that reads faces and gestures in lieu of a joystick or console. (Imagine the possibilities of a computer reading your face during an e-learning course.)

>> The increasing importance of online components to all games, including “serious games.” (Might it be time for e-learning professionals to consider online components when developing employee knowledge systems?)

>> Games that are displayed in 3-D are in the developmental stage. (This is a huge $19 billion U.S. market — and worth watching to see what is coming down the pipe for today’s learning systems.)

>> The integration of virtual worlds with Internet-based gaming. (Virtual worlds are important to the e-learning industry, because corporate training can put learners in virtual environments to see how they react to situations and problems that they might face in their jobs. More 2,000 global enterprises, 600 universities, 35 international governments, and several divisions of the U.S. federal government — including the Departments of State, Homeland Security, NOAA, NASA, Army, Navy and Air Force — now exploit Second Life technology to connect with stakeholders around the world, communicate complex ideas, train and collaborate.)

For more about the Electronic Entertainment Expo, visit the Website www.e3expo.com.

The Electronic Entertainment Expo kicks off today in Los Angeles, and a big topic of conversation will be how the virtual world and 3-D video formats will be changing over the next few years.

“With groundbreaking announcements expected from computer and video game publishers and developers, this year’s E3 Expo is going to be the main event for the entertainment industry in 2010,” says Michael D. Gallagher, president and CEO of the Entertainment Software Association, which represents U.S. computer and video game publishers and owns E3 Expo. “Major retailers, investor analyst firms and media from the United States and more than 60 countries are already committed to attending.”

Some of the learning-related stories that may develop this week:

>> MicroSoft’s launch of Natel, a PC-based visualization game that reads faces and gestures in lieu of a joystick or console. (Imagine the possibilities of a computer reading your face during an e-learning course.)

>> The increasing importance of online components to all games, including “serious games.” (Might it be time for e-learning professionals to consider online components when developing employee knowledge systems?)

>> Games that are displayed in 3-D are in the developmental stage. (This is a huge $19 billion U.S. market — and worth watching to see what is coming down the pipe for today’s learning systems.)

>> The integration of virtual worlds with Internet-based gaming. (Virtual worlds are important to the e-learning industry, because corporate training can put learners in virtual environments to see how they react to situations and problems that they might face in their jobs. More 2,000 global enterprises, 600 universities, 35 international governments, and several divisions of the U.S. federal government — including the Departments of State, Homeland Security, NOAA, NASA, Army, Navy and Air Force — now exploit Second Life technology to connect with stakeholders around the world, communicate complex ideas, train and collaborate.)

For more about the Electronic Entertainment Expo, visit the Website www.e3expo.com.

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