Getting Serious About Virtual Worlds

The use of virtual worlds technology for business applications is gaining momentum, as demonstrated by a Virtual Worlds at Work Symposium held at SRI Consulting Business Intelligence in Menlo Park, Calif. The symposium focused on applying the unique characteristics of virtual environments to sales training, new employee onboarding, and other aspects of knowledge management and employee engagement.

“We expect to have 15,000 to 20,000 IBM employees in virtual worlds by the end of this year,” said Chuck Hamilton, IBM’s director of the Center of Advanced Learning, as he kicked off the event.

“Over the last year or two, the topic of virtual worlds saw dramatic interest by the news media,” said Dr. Eilif Trondsen, program and research director for the Virtual-Worlds Consortium for Innovation and Learning at SRI. “But very little attention has been given to how virtual worlds can transform specific areas of learning and training in corporations.”

John Boring, CEO of Accelerate Technology, presented a case study on the Virtual World applications developed for Silicon Image on the ActiveWorlds platform. Also presenting the case was Andrew Turnbull and Doug Haslam, both of Silicon Image.

“A number of leading organizations are already betting that the future of learning won’t be built on flat, static Web pages but rather in traversable 3-D spaces,” said Anders Gronstedt, president of the Gronstedt Group, who led a panel on sales training in the virtual world. “It’s transforming sales training.”

The symposium was co-sponsored by SRI Consulting Business Intelligence (www.sricbi. com), The Gronstedt Group (www.gronstedtgroup.com) and Accelerate Technology (www.accelerate-ld.com).  

The use of virtual worlds technology for business applications is gaining momentum, as demonstrated by a Virtual Worlds at Work Symposium held at SRI Consulting Business Intelligence in Menlo Park, Calif. The symposium focused on applying the unique characteristics of virtual environments to sales training, new employee onboarding, and other aspects of knowledge management and employee engagement.

“We expect to have 15,000 to 20,000 IBM employees in virtual worlds by the end of this year,” said Chuck Hamilton, IBM’s director of the Center of Advanced Learning, as he kicked off the event.

“Over the last year or two, the topic of virtual worlds saw dramatic interest by the news media,” said Dr. Eilif Trondsen, program and research director for the Virtual-Worlds Consortium for Innovation and Learning at SRI. “But very little attention has been given to how virtual worlds can transform specific areas of learning and training in corporations.”

John Boring, CEO of Accelerate Technology, presented a case study on the Virtual World applications developed for Silicon Image on the ActiveWorlds platform. Also presenting the case was Andrew Turnbull and Doug Haslam, both of Silicon Image.

“A number of leading organizations are already betting that the future of learning won’t be built on flat, static Web pages but rather in traversable 3-D spaces,” said Anders Gronstedt, president of the Gronstedt Group, who led a panel on sales training in the virtual world. “It’s transforming sales training.”

The symposium was co-sponsored by SRI Consulting Business Intelligence (www.sricbi. com), The Gronstedt Group (www.gronstedtgroup.com) and Accelerate Technology (www.accelerate-ld.com).  

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