Learning Executives’ Confidence Stabilizes

Learning executives continue to be optimistic about the outlook and expectations for the learning function. ASTD’s Learning Executive Confidence Index (LXCI) for the fourth quarter of 2009 remained stable after significant growth across the second and third quarters. The current LXCI surveyed 271 learning executives about their expectations in four areas: impact on corporate performance; ability to meet learning needs; status as a key strategic component; and availability of resources.

The LXCI provides a snapshot of learning executive confidence in the future and factors in expectations of their learning functions’ abilities to meet learning needs and to show impact in corporate productivity, the status of learning as a key strategic component within the organization, and the availability of resources for learning.

Learning executives with low scores (0 to 49 on the scale) anticipate that in six months impact on these three areas will be moderately or substantially worse. Those with higher scores (51 to 100 on the scale) expect these areas to moderately or substantially improve.

The quarterly Learning Executive Confidence Index is a composite score for all learning executives included in the survey and reflects the expectations these senior executives have for learning in the next six months. Higher indices (above 50) reflect a more positive outlook and lower indices a more negative.

Source: American Society for Training and Development

Learning executives continue to be optimistic about the outlook and expectations for the learning function. ASTD’s Learning Executive Confidence Index (LXCI) for the fourth quarter of 2009 remained stable after significant growth across the second and third quarters. The current LXCI surveyed 271 learning executives about their expectations in four areas: impact on corporate performance; ability to meet learning needs; status as a key strategic component; and availability of resources.

The LXCI provides a snapshot of learning executive confidence in the future and factors in expectations of their learning functions’ abilities to meet learning needs and to show impact in corporate productivity, the status of learning as a key strategic component within the organization, and the availability of resources for learning.

Learning executives with low scores (0 to 49 on the scale) anticipate that in six months impact on these three areas will be moderately or substantially worse. Those with higher scores (51 to 100 on the scale) expect these areas to moderately or substantially improve.

The quarterly Learning Executive Confidence Index is a composite score for all learning executives included in the survey and reflects the expectations these senior executives have for learning in the next six months. Higher indices (above 50) reflect a more positive outlook and lower indices a more negative.

Source: American Society for Training and Development

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